William and Kate snapped in front of ‘Healing Hurt’ heart mural

Just days after the royals were plunged into a family crisis, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have been pictured standing in front of a “Healing Hurt” heart mural – complete with a crown.

William and Kate were visiting Newham ambulance station in east London to hear how the paramedics and staff have coped during the pandemic.

The street art – in the station’s wellbeing garden – featured a red heart mended with two plasters, beneath a golden crown, and above the words in capitals “Healing Hurt”.

The monarchy has been dealing with the fallout from the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s bombshell Oprah interview but there appears to be some way to go before the royal family’s relationships are repaired.

US presenter Gayle King – a friend of Meghan’s – said this week that initial talks between Harry and his father the Prince of Wales and William were “not productive”.

She also said no-one from the royal family had yet talked to Meghan.

The duchess accused the royal family of racism but also said the institution failed to help her when she had suicidal thoughts.

The Sussexes during their Oprah interview
The Sussexes during their Oprah interview (Yui Mok/PA)

Harry said he felt let down by his father the Prince of Wales and wanted to heal the relationship but “there’s a lot of hurt that’s happened”.

The duke described his relationship with William as “space” but said he loved him and “time heals all things, hopefully”.

The brothers’ rift stretches back to before Harry and Meghan’s wedding, apparently when Harry was angered by what he perceived as his brother’s “snobbish” attitude to Meghan, after William questioned whether he should rush into things with the ex-Suits star.

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The Queen has said the issues raised in the Oprah interview will be dealt with privately as a family, but that “some recollections may vary”.

The wellbeing garden at the station was established in 2019 as a way of promoting discussion about mental health.

The colourful murals and paintings were by street art group Art Under The Hood.

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