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Are You Brave Enough to Fly 75mph Along World's Longest Over-Water Zip Line 89 video https://img.vidible.tv/prod/2017-04/20/58f8e38eb90afb2ed0411105/58f8e38dd9822631bc6f778d_o_F_v1.jpg Are you a thrill seeker looking for the next adrenaline rush? Do you love the rush of wind in your hair as you fly through the air hundreds of feet above the ground? Well, perhaps you should make your way down to Mexico's Acapulco and try out the world's longest zipline course running over water. Daredevils can ride on the zipline, which spanns nearly a mile in length, and enjoy the majestic sights of Puerto Marques Bay, all while hurtling along at speeds of up to 75 mph. Four separate lines suspended 328 feet above sea level run parallel from a mountaintop on the mainland and over the Puerto Marques bay to the end of the line, located on the tip of the Cabo Marques Peninsula. Before ziplines became the tourist attractions they are today, they were used to fulfill a very practical need - crossing large expanses and chasms. Civilizations across the world, including Asia and Europe, used ziplines as bridges when no better path could be found. Even when bridges were built, some ziplines continued to be used to transport food and other goods. But now, they are mainly used to provide the thrill of flying and zipping through the air. Ruptly TV 2017-04-20 16:31:44
Are You Brave Enough to Fly 75mph Along World's Longest Over-Water Zip Line
Are you a thrill seeker looking for the next adrenaline rush? Do you love the rush of wind in your hair as you fly through the air hundreds of feet above the ground? Well, perhaps you should make your way down to Mexico's Acapulco and try out the world's longest zipline course running over water. Daredevils can ride on the zipline, which spanns nearly a mile in length, and enjoy the majestic sights of Puerto Marques Bay, all while hurtling along at speeds of up to 75 mph. Four separate lines suspended 328 feet above sea level run parallel from a mountaintop on the mainland and over the Puerto Marques bay to the end of the line, located on the tip of the Cabo Marques Peninsula. Before ziplines became the tourist attractions they are today, they were used to fulfill a very practical need - crossing large expanses and chasms. Civilizations across the world, including Asia and Europe, used ziplines as bridges when no better path could be found. Even when bridges were built, some ziplines continued to be used to transport food and other goods. But now, they are mainly used to provide the thrill of flying and zipping through the air.