Couple will be first ever to get married in British Antarctica

Twenty guests will be joining them for the special ceremony

Updated: 

A loved up couple will make history this weekend when they become the first to get married in the British Antarctic Territory.

Polar field guides Julie Baum and Tom Sylvester will tie in knot in plummeting temperatures at the Rothera Research Station, almost 2,000 miles south of the Falkland Islands.

See also: Unusual 'dragon-skin' ice appears in Antarctica

See also: Giant Antarctic ice shelf hanging by a thread, scientists warn

Twenty guests will join them for the wedding where the exact timing of the ceremony will be dependent on weather conditions.

The research base currently has limited daylight while freezing gusts of wind reaches speeds of up to 30mph, according to the British Antarctic Survey.

Julie and Tom have been in a relationship for 11 years after they met on a trainee scheme and have been engaged for three years.

Credits: PA

Julie Baum and Tom Sylvester

Julie said: "We sort of went out climbing together quite a lot and just became really good friends."

Tom added: "Yeah it's been fantastic. We've not looked back since really.

"We've been through all sorts of adventures together all around the world, in fact we haven't really left each other's sides for the past 10 years.

Credits: De Agostini Editorial

The couple will wed at the Rothera research station

"We've been, we've worked together and we've lived together and moved around together for the past 10 years and it's just been the best time of my life really."

Tom was due to spend the winter at Halley Research Station some 1,038 miles (1,670 km) southeast of the station until it was closed over the winter for safety reasons.

It meant the couple were free to get married in Antarctica, which they dismissed when it was initially suggested to them.

Credits: BBC News & Current Affairs

The couple will become the first to wed in British Antarctica

Julie said: "We looked into it and he was like, 'Ooh we can get married here'."

Julie said women on the base were helping her make a wedding dress which will include part of an orange tent, which will be part of the "something old" tradition.

The ceremony will be conducted by British Antarctic Territory magistrate Paul Samways and will therefore be recognised in UK law.

The world's most extreme places

The world's most extreme places


provided by