Is this the world's most dangerous beach?

Where not to go on holiday unless you like riptides, sharks, quicksand and jellyfish

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Is this the world's most dangerous beach?

We all love a beautiful beach - but some of them are not what they seem.

From deadly creatures lurking in the water (hello sharks and jellyfish) to dangerous undercurrents, several beaches around the world are extremely dangerous, and many of them have taken hundreds of lives.

See also: Man dies after cliff collapse on beach in Suffolk

See also: Tourist in two-hour crawl on Devon beach with broken leg


And according to the Express, the world's most dangerous beach of them all even has the name to prove it. Playa Zipolite in Mexico actually translates to 'Beach of the Dead'.

It may look pretty, but it has extremely lethal undercurrents, and so many people have fallen prey to its good looks without realising the danger that a specialist lifeguard team has now been set up there.

Hanakapiai on Kauai island also has some of the world's worst riptides. An unofficial wooden beach sign there shows more than 80 tally marks representing those who've drowned there, although official reports put the number at thirty.

Britain isn't immune to deadly beaches, either. The Telegraph recently cited beaches along the Jurassic Coast in Dorset as being among the most dangerous thanks to the threat of cliff collapses and rock falls.

Another UK beach in Lancashire, Morecambe Bay, is also notorious for its quicksand and fast moving tides, which took the lives of 23 Chinese cockle pickers in 2004.

Reunion Island, 140 miles from Mauritius in the Indian Ocean, is known as the top spot for its shark attacks - there have been over 20 attacks and seven fatalities since 2011. Another stretch of coast known for sharks in Gansbaai in South Africa, which is great white shark territory. The water between Gyer Island and Geyser Rock is even known as Shark Alley.

Sharks, meanwhile, are not the only creatures to fear at the beach. At Fraser Island in Queensland, Australia, there's a side serving of jellyfish with your sharks and dangerous riptides. What's more, head inland and you may also find some of the world's deadliest spiders, dingoes, and large saltwater crocodiles.

See more of the world's most dangerous beaches below:

World's most dangerous beaches

World's most dangerous beaches