Orangutan climbs onto tourist boat and slaps selfie-taker

Tourist told what for when trying to take a selfie

Updated: 
Orangutan climbs onto tourist boat and slaps selfie-taker

A group of tourists in Indonesia captured the moment an orangutan joined them on a boat - before slapping one of them in the face.

The video was uploaded to YouTube and shows the boys and their guides on a boat travelling down the Sekonyer river in the Borneo jungle.

See also: Baby orangutan rescued after six months chained by the neck

See also: Zoo orangutan likes to kiss baby bumps

The video was uploaded with the caption: "2nd day in the Borneo Jungle we came across a wild orangutan hanging over the river on our way to Camp Leakey, who joined us in the boat and slapped Hahn across the face!"

The orangutan leans in from the jungle and happily takes snacks from the group, but doesn't seem to like it when one of them wants to take a selfie with it instead of handing over food.

The animal slaps the man in the face and he can be heard laughing, "He just slapped me, like, right on the nose!".

Borneo and Sumatra are the only places you can see orangutans in the wild.

Orangutans are the most arboreal of the great apes and spend most of their time in trees.

They are also the most solitary of the great apes, with social bonds occurring primarily between mothers and their dependent offspring, who stay together for the first two years.

Fruit is the most important component of an orangutan's diet; however, the apes will also eat vegetation, bark, honey, insects and even bird eggs. They can live over 30 years in both the wild and captivity.

Orangutans are classified as critically endangered. Human activities have caused severe declines in the populations and ranges of both species. Threats to wild orangutan populations include poaching, habitat destruction, and the illegal pet trade.


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