Federer: Nothing to improve for Australian Open final

Updated: 

Roger Federer says there is nothing for him to improve as he aims to down Marin Cilic and win a 20th grand slam title in Sunday's Australian Open final.

The Swiss maestro has not dropped a set throughout the tournament and benefited from Hyeon Chung's retirement in Friday's last-four contest in Melbourne, where Federer was leading 6-1 5-2.

Defending champion Federer will now meet Cilic, whom he defeated to win slam number 19 at Wimbledon last year - with the Croatian left in tears after struggling with blisters.

And evergreen 36-year-old Federer does not think it prudent to start tweaking his game at this stage of a slam.

"No [nothing to improve], I just have to play a good match. At this point it's not about having to improve anything in particular," he told reporters. 

"I think I've done everything pretty well, you know. I just hope I'm going to have a good start to the match. 

"I hope I can mix up my game. I hope I can start serving well from the get-go, not get into too much trouble early. I hope I can read his serve and all these things. 

"I'm just pleased that actually my game has been good from the very beginning of the tournament so far. I mean, I've won all my matches without dropping a set. 

"Clearly I was a bit lucky against [Tomas] Berdych in that first set. But things must be all right if I'm in this stage right now not having dropped a set and in the finals."

Cilic made a major breakthrough by winning the 2014 US Open, a moment that Federer believes changed his mentality.

"I mean, I definitely think him winning the US Open, like Stan [Wawrinka] winning here a few years ago, it gave them great belief they can do it, if the big moments come about, that they can attain this level," he added. 

"Not easily, but they can get there from time to time. I think he played great against Rafa [Nadal]. I think the belief and the way he played very positive made him win that match because he didn't look good there for a while when he was down a set and a break and everything.

"Even at the end of last year when I played him in the World Tour Finals in the round-robin, I think he lost all three matches maybe, but maybe should have won at least one of the first two and stuff. 

"The way he came out against me was very much a winner's attitude: 'At least I'm going to take maybe one match home against Roger'. I ended up playing a tough three-setter against him. 

"I didn't feel I was facing a guy who had just lost two round-robin matches."