Muguruza: I want to dance with Roger Federer

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Garbine Muguruza will be supporting Roger Federer in Sunday's men's final at Wimbledon so she can dance with the Swiss at the Champions Ball.

Muguruza clinched her second grand slam title on Saturday with a 7-5 6-0 victory over Venus Williams on Centre Court, the Spaniard winning the final nine games to claim the trophy.

Wimbledon tradition dictates that the champions of the men's and women's draws share a dance at the post-tournament party, meaning the 23-year-old will be partnered by Federer or Marin Cilic.

And Muguruza is hoping to see the 35-year-old Federer come out triumphant so she can see his moves on the dancefloor.

"Oh, c'mon!," she said when asked about her prospective dance partner, before adding: "Roger.

"And I like Cilic, I have to say seriously. But I want to see if he's that elegant also dancing."

Her comprehensive victory over Williams was redemption for Muguruza after she was beaten in the final by Venus' sister Serena in 2015.

She says the memories of that final defeat spurred her on to go one better in the future, and she is delighted to have achieved her goal so quickly.

"I always come very motivated to the grand slams," she said. "Since I lost the final here I wanted to change that.

"I came thinking, I'm prepared, I feel good. During the tournament and the matches, I was feeling better and better. Every match, I was increasing my level.

"I think today [Saturday], you know, I played well."

Now her name takes its place alongside both Williams sisters on the honours board after she became just the second Spanish woman to win the singles title, emulating her temporary coach Conchita Martinez's success in 1994.

"It was amazing [to see it there]," she added. "Like I said before, I always look at the wall and see all the names and all the history. 

"I lost that final. I'm like, I was close. I didn't want to lose this time, because I know the difference. I really know the difference of making a final.

"So I am happy that it's there now."