Australia players face unemployment as pay dispute rumbles on

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Australia's elite players are facing unemployment after Cricket Australia (CA) accepted that the ongoing pay dispute will not be resolved before Friday's deadline.

CA released a statement acknowledging that a deal will not be struck ahead of the stated cut-off and called on the Australian Cricketers' Association (ACA) to "come to the negotiating table".

The governing body expressed its disappointment over the ACA's "unwillingness to consider the sensible and necessary change" and urged the players' union to show "genuine flexibility in the best interests of the players and the game".

Last week the ACA rejected an improved pay offer from CA and advised players not to sign the new terms put forward.

More than 200 players will be unemployed due to the impasse not being resolved before the weekend, placing Australia's tour of Bangladesh in August in doubt as well as the Ashes series against England, which begins in November.

In a lengthy statement, CA said: "A week ago CA offered significant concessions in an effort to reach an agreement by 30 June. These were also rejected out of hand through the media - again without any discussion - by the ACA.

"Those concessions were a genuine attempt by CA to address key concerns raised by players, including the inclusion of all domestic players alongside internationals in the share of the game's surplus.

"Over the past months CA has repeatedly sought to engage with the ACA in a genuine dialogue and to commence a proper negotiation process. It is regrettable that these efforts have been rebuffed, resulting in the current situation which CA recognises is not in the interests of either the players or the game.

"CA is concerned that many players will be without a contract from midnight tonight and this may place significant financial and emotional strain on them and their families. It is unfortunate that the ACA's hard line and inflexible position has not been conducive to delivering any positive outcomes or certainty for players.

"CA has also been dismayed that the ACA's rhetoric, both publicly and directly to the players, has burdened the current generation of players with an unfair sense of responsibility for defending a decades old pay model that no longer suits the very different needs of the modern game.

"The existing revenue share model has achieved its purpose and was never intended to be an heirloom passed down over the decades, never to be changed."