How the Masters was won: Garcia's titanic duel with Rose

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Sergio Garcia claimed Masters glory on Sunday, beating Justin Rose in a play-off following a thrilling fourth round.

After 22 top-10 finishes without success in a major, Garcia finally got the job done, but it was far from an easy ride.

We take a look at how his fascinating duel with Rose unfolded on another memorable final day at Augusta.

 

GARCIA MAKES FIRST MOVE, BUT ROSE RESPONDS

Garcia could hardly have asked for a better start. Birdies at the first and third lifted him to eight under and, with the likes of Rickie Fowler and Jordan Spieth starting slowly, the Spaniard's advantage was increased to three strokes as Rose bogeyed the fifth. However, birdies at six, seven and eight saw the apparently nerveless Rose quickly regain a share of the lead.

 

NOW THE FUN BEGINS

It is often said that the Masters only truly starts when the leaders reach the back nine. All of a sudden, Garcia was looking ragged and, when he bogeyed 10, Rose found himself in sole possession of the lead for the first time following a scrambling par. Garcia then dropped another shot at the 11th after finding trouble off the tee, meaning Rose, who saw a presentable birdie chance slip by at the same hole, was two clear with seven to play.

 

HEROIC PAR SAVE KEEPS SERGIO ALIVE

By the time Garcia took a penalty drop on 13, after tugging his drive left, his chances appeared to be fading fast. However, he duly rescued a heroic par and Rose missed a short birdie putt - meaning the lead remained two strokes.

 

AND IT'S BACK TO ALL-SQUARE!

Having rescued that par, Garcia looked a different player as he fired a stunning approach to 14 and made birdie, before an even better iron set up a stunning eagle at the par-five 15th. Rose held his nerve to follow Garcia's three with a four, meaning the duo were all tied up at nine under, with three to play.

 

ROSE RECLAIMS LEAD, BUT ONLY BRIEFLY ...

Rose again showed his character at the next. A red-hot Garcia fired his tee shot on 16 to six feet, but the Olympic champion responded with a similarly brilliant shot that earned a high five from his smiling rival. Rose duly converted his birdie opportunity from eight feet and Garcia could not follow suit. Yet there was another swing at 17 when Rose failed to get up and down from the sand, leaving both men level once more.

 

GARCIA'S BIG CHANCE GOES BEGGING ON 18

There was a lucky break for Rose on the last as his second shot kicked left off a bank to leave a seven-footer for birdie, but Garcia was undeterred and struck another magnificent approach to five feet. When Rose's birdie try just about stayed up on the high side, Garcia's crowning moment looked to have arrived. However, the Spaniard pushed his putt and a play-off was required.

 

BUT THE SPANIARD PREVAILS

Advantage Rose, you might have thought? Not when he went right off the tee after the players returned to the 18th. Rose was forced to chip out with his second and could not save par, leaving Garcia with two putts from 12 feet for the title after more great iron play from the Spaniard. Only one stroke was needed as Garcia finally ended his long wait for a major title, to the delight of the packed galleries at Augusta.