Misbah to take time over retirement decision

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Misbah-ul-Haq is in no rush to make a decision over his Test future, after Australia completed a 3-0 whitewash of Pakistan with a 220-run victory in Sydney on Saturday.

Pakistan's 42-year-old skipper cut a despondent figure following his team's second-Test loss in Melbourne and raised the possibility of retiring ahead of this week's contest at the SCG.

However, Misbah - who ended his limited-overs career in 2015 - opted to continue and now plans to take his time before confirming whether he will carry on in Tests.

"About my future, there is a fair bit of time. We go back [to Pakistan], there is a bit of time off, there is a month in which this ODI series [between Australia and Pakistan] happens," said the veteran.

"Then there is the PSL [Pakistan Super League]. So I think there is time to sit down and think about whatever decision I am going to make."

So often a reliable performer for his country, Misbah managed just 76 runs in six innings against Australia.

However, he took heart from the performances of the tourists' other batsmen - Azhar Ali leading the way with 406 runs at 81 - and felt Pakistan's main problem throughout the series was their bowling.

"I think our bowling is always our strength, but in this series, [we are a] bit disappointed that we could not take 20 wickets in any Test match. That's why we were behind in every game," he explained.

"Normally we say that it's not easy for Asian batsmen to come here and score runs, but mainly what I have seen is that it's difficult for us or any Asian side to come here and take 20 wickets in a Test. That's an art and we could not do that. That mainly cost us the series.

"There are a lot of positives in the batting - Azhar Ali, Asad Shafiq, Younis Khan, Sarfraz [Ahmed], they played well here."

Pakistan's Test record in Australia is miserable and Misbah believes that will not change in the near future unless players are given more exposure to foreign conditions.

"If we are not touring more often in Australia and South Africa, it could happen again and again," he reflected.

"I've already suggested that some of our players should be sent here to Australia on a regular basis in their academies, just to play games here, to practice here, get used to these conditions.

"This is the only way we can improve. Otherwise, if you are coming here after five or six years and half of your team are touring here for the first time, whether it's the bowling or batting unit, you're going to struggle."