0  of 21
Weirdest travel phobias
  • Many people who suffer from agrizoophobia grow up in urban areas and are used to a city lifestyle. But if it's their mission to overcome the fear of wild animals, an African safari holiday might be the perfect trip.

  • As Hong Kong is situated among steep hills and sloping valleys, the locals came up with a brilliant solution for negotiating the challenging terrain. The Central–Mid-Levels escalators in Hong Kong form the longest outdoor covered escalator system in the world. It covers 800 metres and elevates over 135 metres from the bottom to the top. While it might be fun for some, it's best avoided if you have escalaphobia.

  • Many of us can't stand the cold but if you suffer from cryophobia, you have an overwhelming and persistent fear of it. If you're desperate to overcome your phobia, the Icehotel in Jukkasjärvi, Sweden is just the place. Here you can sleep in a bed made of ice, drink in the Icebar and even get married at the Ice church.

  • Few people can handle a drive along Death Road in Bolivia, the world's most dangerous road, but anyone with hodophobia, the fear of travelling, should steer well clear. In fact, hodophobia sufferers can fear all types of travel, from trains to flying and cruise ships.

  • While the majority of visitors to Seattle are happy to marvel at the iconic Space Needle, just a glimpse of the tower might intimidate aichmophobes. The Eiffel Tower, Washington Monument and Burj Khalifa are probably best avoided too.

  • We're not sure why the phobia of long words was given such a long name but we do know the places to avoid if you suffer from hippopotomonstrosesquipedaliophobia. Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch in Wales translates as 'Saint Mary's Church in a hollow of white hazel near the swirling whirlpool of the church of Saint Tysilio with a red cave'. And the longest place name in the world is Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapikimaungahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu in New Zealand.

  • Going on holiday, whether at home or abroad, won't be fun if you suffer from heliophobia. Fear of sunlight could arise from concerns about skin cancer or even the eventual end of the world in a giant sun explosion but, like vampires, heliophobes will do anything to avoid sunlight - cover the windows, slather on a thick layer of sun lotion and hide behind dark sunglasses.

  • If you're a dendrophobe, you won't want to go anywhere near a forest. While many people see trees as soothing and peaceful, others are put off by dense foliage and gnarled trunks. One place to avoid is the Avenue of the Baobabs in Madagascar, where the towering baobab trees line each side of the path. There are up to 25 striking trees that grow up to 800 years and are a legacy of the once-dense tropical forests that thrived on the island.

  • While the Acropolis in Greece and Italy's Pompeii may be two of the most fascinating sites to visit for history buffs, atephobics have a morbid worry of disaster and being ruined, therefore won't want to be exposed to these historical attractions or anything associated with a recent disaster.

  • Everyone likes their own personal space but if you have an intense fear of being touched or touching others, you'll want to steer clear of crowded cities and public transport. Shanghai in China is the most populated city in the world, with more than 17 million people. Istanbul and Mumbai are other crowded cities and you certainly won't want to travel on the New York City Subway or London Tube at rush hour, where thousands of commuters fill the stations.

  • Don't take a xerophobe to the desert. Not only do they fear dry places, but also dry food and skin. Xerophobes will avoid dry climates, carry moisturising lotion and drink plenty of fluids. The Atacama Desert is the driest place in the world, with just 15mm of rain per year. You won't find any of the world's xerophobes in this South American desert.

  • With mobile phones and tablets such a major form of modern communication, it's no wonder that 53 per cent of Britain's mobile phone users suffer from 'no-mobile-phone phobia'. Holiday companies are even offering tech-free packages where they take away your phone and leave you to enjoy the surrounding nature on a detox break. Those looking to overcome nomophobia should head to one of the world's remote islands, such as Desroches Island in the Seychelles, where you'll have no choice but to be without technology as there is no mobile phone reception and just the sun, sea and sand to enjoy.

  • There are people who fear riding a bike or even being near one. Cyclophobes looking for a cure should visit Amsterdam with its one million bicycles. The bike-friendly city is flat and there are 400km of paths for cyclists.

  • Who actually enjoys waiting? Waiting to board a plane, standing at a bar and even being put on the list to dine at a Michelin-starred restaurant - few of us like being in a queue. But for macrophobia sufferers the thought of a long wait is just too much. The airport experience will leave them agitated and uncomfortable. Macrophobes may need to pay extra for fast check-in, go to an airport lounge to avoid waiting at the gate and even board the plane last so they're not biting their nails before departure.

  • Limnophobia is an all-consuming fear of what lies beneath lakes, marshes and other murky bodies of water. Limnophobes won't enjoy wild swimming, picnicking by a lake or even sailing on one. They may avoid the Lake District altogether as even the name could conjure up thoughts of drowning or being attacked by something in the water.

  • If fast travel makes you feel breathless, dizzy or shaky, you could be a tachophobe. An accident involving a speedy car or a bad rollercoaster ride experience could cause tachophobia. Abu Dhabi's Ferrari World is home to the world's fastest rollercoaster, travelling at 149 miles per hour and is certainly no ride for anyone who fears high speeds.

  • A phobia of strange odours can lead to migraines and can even extend to all smells. Those suffering from osmophobia will avoid buying smelly cheeses in France, going to Thailand's Durian Festival which celebrates the world's most vile-smelling fruit or even visiting the beautiful but stinky hot springs of Rotorua in New Zealand.

  • Some anthophobes are afraid of all flowers and others more specific types. Either way, they won't be seen in a garden such as Madeira's Botanical Garden, which is home to 2,500 exotic plants from all continents mixed into a colourful mosaic.

  • If you have a fear of bridges, the mere thought of driving or walking over one could bring on a panic attack. The length and height of the bridge can freak out gephyrophobes and they'll often drive miles out of their way to find an alternative route. Want to overcome your fear? Take a walk on the Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge in Northern Ireland. It links the mainland to a tiny island and is 30 metres above the rocks below.

  • Strong winds can be dangerous, especially if you're close to the sea or near trees but for ancraophobics, it's much more than this. For them, a gently summer breeze, seeing a kite or just looking at the ocean waves are a reminder of the wind's ability to kill and destroy. A place they'll want to avoid is Commonwealth Bay in Antarctica, aka the windiest place on Earth. Here, winds frequently exceed 150 miles per hour and katabatic winds cause strong and lasting storms in the winter, sometimes accompanied by powerful whirlpools.