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The low-skilled jobs most Brits won't do
  • Workers are seen at the construction site of 22 Bishopsgate in London, Britain June 25, 2019. Picture taken June 25, 2019. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
  • Eastern European workers pack asparagus at Cobrey Farm in Ross-on-Wye, Britain, March 11, 2019. Picture taken March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
  • Businessman making booking at front desk with Latin receptionists in hotel lobby
  • cheerful maid touching button on washing machine in laundry
  • the team of cooks backs in the work in the modern kitchen, the workflow of the restaurant in the kitchen. Copy space for text.
  • A builder is silhouetted as he works on a construction site in London, Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2018. The Migration Advisory Committee has advised the government on Tuesday in a new report, to restrict the number of lower skilled EU workers (which would include construction workers)allowed to enter the UK Britain's Brexit split from the EU. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
  • Teenage boy is walking back from the shop with his grandparent. He is carrying the shopping bag and they are linking arms.
  • Eastern European workers pack asparagus at Cobrey Farm in Ross-on-Wye, Britain, March 11, 2019. Picture taken March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
  • An eastern European worker packs asparagus at Cobrey Farm in Ross-on-Wye, Britain, March 11, 2019. Picture taken March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
  • A mature man caregiver with stethoscope and old patient looking out through window.
  • An Eastern European worker tends the fruit trees at Cobrey Farm in Ross-on-Wye, Britain, March 11, 2019. Picture taken March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
  • Smiling female receptionist giving credit card to businessman while standing at hotel reception
  • Eastern European workers pack asparagus at Cobrey Farm in Ross-on-Wye, Britain, March 11, 2019. Picture taken March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
  • A construction worker stands in front of a door with the EU stars at EU headquarters in Brussels, Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019. Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar said that big gaps remain between Britain and the European Union as they try to secure a Brexit deal by next week.(AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
  • Workers clean graffiti against Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson outside Downing Street in London, Britain October 22, 2019. REUTERS/Simon Dawson
  • Eastern European workers walk through their accommodation area at Cobrey Farm in Ross-on-Wye, Britain, March 11, 2019. Picture taken March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
  • The luggage of newly arrived eastern European workers is seen at Cobrey Farm in Ross-on-Wye, Britain, March 11, 2019. Picture taken March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
  • Maid making bed in hotel room. Staff Maid Making Bed. African housekeeper making bed.
  • Migrant workers pick lettuce on a farm in Kent, Britain July 24, 2017. Picture taken July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
  • A migrant worker carries boxes on a farm in Kent, Britain July 24, 2017. Picture taken July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
  • Migrant workers pick lettuce on a farm in Kent, Britain July 24, 2017. Picture taken July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
  • A migrant worker examines a lettuce at a farm in Kent, Britain July 24, 2017. Picture taken July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Neil Hall
  • A worker tends to oysters on William Lynch's oyster farm on Lough Foyle in Culmore, Northern Ireland, February 10, 2017. REUTERS/Clodagh Kilcoyne SEARCH "CARLINGFORD" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
  • Migrant workers pick apples at Stocks Farm in Suckley, Britain October 10, 2016. Picture taken October 10, 2016. To match Insight BRITAIN-EU/MIGRANT-WORKERS REUTERS/Eddie Keogh
  • Migrant workers pick apples at Stocks Farm in Suckley, Britain October 10, 2016. Picture taken October 10, 2016. REUTERS/Eddie Keogh
  • Picked apples are seen at Stocks Farm which employs migrant workers to help harvest the fruit, in Suckley, Britain October 10, 2016. Picture taken October 10, 2016. To match Insight BRITAIN-EU/MIGRANT-WORKERS REUTERS/Eddie Keogh
  • REFILE Workers planting pumpkins at Poskitts farm in Goole, Britain May 23, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Yates
  • REFILE Workers sort Carrots at Poskitts farm in Goole, Britain May 23, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Yates
  • REFILE Workers planting Punkin's at Poskitts farm in Goole, Britain May 23, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Yates
  • REFILE Workers planting Punkin's at Poskitts farm in Goole, Britain May 23, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Yates
  • A Eastern European worker cleans a mobile home in the accommodation area at Cobrey Farm in Ross-on-Wye, Britain, March 11, 2019. Picture taken March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls
  • REFILE Workers sort Carrots at Poskitts farm in Goole, Britain May 23, 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Yates
  • In this photo taken on Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016, fresh strawberries are weighted on a production line, at Boxford Suffolk Farm, in Suffolk, England. British fruit and vegetable growers rely on seasonal workers from other EU countries to harvest their crops because local workers no longer want the poorly paid, physically demanding jobs that offer little security. EU citizens have the automatic right to work in any member state, and low-skilled east European laborers have helped fuel Britain’s economy since their countries joined the bloc in 2004. (AP Photo /Leonora Beck)