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Stonehenge repairs in 1958
  • The final stone is put in place in the restoration of Stonehenge. The giant lintel is laid across the top of the trilithons 57 and 58.
  • Radioactive sodium, rushed from the pile at Harwell, was used to detect cracks in the 45 tonne Trilithon 58, last of the giant stones being placed in its original position in the restoration of Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain.
  • Professor Richard Atkinson, Professor at Edinburgh University, left, with Professor Stuart Piggott, leader of the team. The bearded man is Malcolm Murray who is photographing all the work by the team at Stonehenge. Looking on are Bridget Wilson and Derek Simpson (both at right), members of the Edinburgh University team who are carrying out excavations in the hope of finding new evidence on the origins of the ancient monument.
  • Sally Kistruck, member of the Edinburgh University team, wheels away a barrowload of earth, spoil from the current excavations at Stonehenge, the prehistoric monument on Salisbury Plain. The excavations are being made in the hope of finding new evidence on the origins of the great circle of stones. Concurrently with the excavations, the Ministry of Works is restoring a small part of Stonehenge.
  • Edwina Field, left, and Sally Kistruck, extreme right, members of the Edinburgh University team, digging at Stonehenge, the prehistoric monument on Salisbury Plain. In the background are Professor Stuart Piggott, Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology at Edinburgh University and leader of the team (right) and Professor Richard Atkinson. The excavations are being made in the hope of finding new evidence on the origins of the great circle of stones.
  • A 20 tonne slab of stone, carefully cradled to distribute the weight and prevent breakage, is lifted by a crane at Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain. The Ministry of Works is restoring one of the trilithons (two upright stones with a lintel), which crashed to earth in 1797.
  • A 20 tonne slab of stone, carefully cradled to distribute the weight and prevent breakage, is lifted by a crane at Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain. The Ministry of Works is restoring one of the trilithons (two upright stones with a lintel), which crashed to earth in 1797.
  • A 20 tonne slab of stone, carefully cradled to distribute the weight and prevent breakage, is fixed by workmen into the cradle before being lifted by a crane at Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain. The Ministry of Works is restoring one of the trilithons (two upright stones with a lintel), which crashed to earth in 1797.
  • STONEHENGE 1958: A 60 ton crane in use at Stonehenge, Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire, to raise a slab of rock weighing 20 tons which is carefully cradled to distribute the weight. The Ministry of Works is restoring one of the trilithons which crashed to earth in 1797.
  • A 20 tonne slab of stone, carefully cradled to distribute the weight and prevent breakage, is lifted by a crane at Stonehenge on Salisbury Plain. The Ministry of Works is restoring one of the trilithons (two upright stones with a lintel), which crashed to earth in 1797.
  • T.A Bailey, a Ministry of Works senior architect (left) and R.W Frost, a senior structrual engineer, on the site at Stonehenge looking at the work to restore a small part of the national monument, one of the trilithons (two upright stones with a lintel), which crashed to earth in 1797.