Captain Sir Tom Moore’s family open memorial walkway at Army training college

The family of Captain Sir Tom Moore have opened a walkway in his memory at the Army Foundation College where he was honorary colonel.

Sir Tom’s daughter Hannah Ingram-Moore said only his knighthood ceremony with the Queen at Windsor Castle rivalled the pride he felt when he was given the honorary rank at the college in Harrogate, which trains teenagers to join the Army.

Mrs Ingram-Moore cut the ribbon on the walkway with her husband Colin and their children Benjie and Georgia.

Captain Sir Tom Moore's daughter Hannah Ingram-Moore cuts a ribbon to officially open the walkway
Sir Tom’s daughter Hannah Ingram-Moore cuts a ribbon to officially open the walkway (Danny Lawson/PA)

The family were visiting the college two days after laying Sir Tom to rest in the family grave in Keighley.

Mrs Ingram-Moore told the PA news agency: “It’s just an incredible moment to be back here.

“There’s no question in our minds that two of the proudest moments for my father in the last year of his life were being knighted by the Queen and becoming the honorary colonel of the Harrogate Army Foundation College.

“Absolutely extraordinary.”

She said: “His pride was immense and we, the family, hope to continue the legacy and connection for as long as the Army want us to.”

Sir Tom, who served as an Army officer in the Second World War, visited the college twice last year and Mrs Ingram-Moore said every moment was “peppered with absolute joy”.

Sir Tom's family during the ceremony
Georgia, left to right, Hannah and Benjie Ingram-Moore (Danny Lawson/PA)

Mrs Ingram-Moore said: “My father felt so proud of his time in the Army and there’s no question that people around the world associate him with the British Army.

“That’s a responsibility that the Army shares with us as a family, to ensure that lasting legacy hopefully lives on.”

Benjie Ingram-Moore said his grandfather was able to “connect the generations”.

He said: “The hardest thing, he said, was the war against the jungle when he was in Burma.

“For him, passing on those messages to them (the junior soldiers) – a bit of hope moving forwards – that was the best thing for him.”

The college’s commanding officer Lieutenant Colonel Simon Farebrother said the walkway was only one way Sir Tom would be remembered.

Benjie, left, and Georgia Ingram-Moore unveil a plaque at the Army Foundation College
Benjie, left, and Georgia Ingram-Moore unveil a plaque at the Army Foundation College (Danny Lawson/PA)

He said the Captain Sir Tom Moore Trophy for charitable endeavour would also be awarded to outstanding junior soldiers.

Lt Col Farebrother said: “When they pass out from their passing out parade in August or March, the junior soldiers will march down the steps he took on their way into the British Army.”

He said the junior soldiers loved talking to Sir Tom, who was just as much at ease with the teenagers, their parents or their grandparents.

The officer added: “I think the whole country identifies with this and the great work that he did to bind us all together in a really dark time.”