NI hospitals and schools facing food shortages in ‘major crisis’ – minister

Northern Ireland's hospitals and schools risk running out of food when post-Brexit Irish Sea trade arrangements are fully implemented, a Stormont minister has claimed.

A grace period that limits the level of red tape required to move retail food products from Great Britain to Northern Ireland runs out at the end of March.

Once that exemption expires supermarkets will have to comply with more rigorous animal health certification processes under the terms of Brexit's Northern Ireland Protocol.

With depleted supermarket shelves already in evidence in Northern Ireland with the lighter-touch trade controls, Agriculture Minister Edwin Poots warned of a "major crisis" once the grace period ends.

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Empty food shelves in Sainsbury's store in Bangor, Co Down. Boris Johnson has admitted there are "teething problems" in the post-Brexit trade relationship between Great Britain and Northern Ireland as industry experts warned there could be fresh shortages on supermarket shelves.
Freight lorries and heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) are pictured at Dublin Port in Dublin, Ireland on January 12, 2021. - Northern Ireland's supply chain is "within days of falling apart" as new post-Brexit checks stem the flow of freight into the UK province, hauliers warned on Monday. Supermarkets are "experiencing considerable difficulties" stocking shelves since the Brexit transition period ended, said Road Haulage Association (RHA) policy manager for Northern Ireland John Martin. (Photo by PAUL FAITH / AFP) (Photo by PAUL FAITH/AFP via Getty Images)
Depleted shelves in the Donegall Place Marks and Spencer store in Belfast, as major retailers in Northern Ireland continue to experience temporary disruption while they adapt to post-Brexit arrangements. (Photo by Liam McBurney/PA Images via Getty Images)
Depleted shelves in the Donegall Place Marks and Spencer store in Belfast, as major retailers in Northern Ireland continue to experience temporary disruption while they adapt to post-Brexit arrangements. (Photo by Liam McBurney/PA Images via Getty Images)
Depleted shelves in the Donegall Place Marks and Spencer store in Belfast, as major retailers in Northern Ireland continue to experience temporary disruption while they adapt to post-Brexit arrangements. (Photo by Liam McBurney/PA Images via Getty Images)
Signage indicates the direction vehicles should follow depending on the relevant paperwork for crossing to Ireland at the check-in area at Holyhead port in Anglesey, north Wales on January 02, 2021. - Britain on Friday began a new year and life outside the European Union's single market, with the first trucks crossing the Channel by ferry and rail largely reporting few difficulties despite new customs rules. (Photo by Paul ELLIS / AFP) (Photo by PAUL ELLIS/AFP via Getty Images)
Signage welcoming motorists from the Irish Republic into Northern Ireland is pictured on the main Dublin/Belfast motorway near Newry on January 1, 2021, as Britain begins life outside the European Union. - In Northern Ireland, the border with Ireland will be closely watched to ensure movement is unrestricted - key to a 1998 peace deal that ended 30 years of violence over British rule as Britain on Friday began a new year and life outside the European Union after leaving the bloc's single market. (Photo by Paul Faith / AFP) (Photo by PAUL FAITH/AFP via Getty Images)
NEWRY, NORTHERN IRELAND - JANUARY 01: A car crosses the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on January 1, 2021 in Newry, United Kingdom. January 1st 2021 marks the first day of the UK's future outside the European Union. Warrenpoint harbour is one of three point of entry locations situated in Northern Ireland along with Belfast and Larne. (Photo by Charles McQuillan/Getty Images)
Empty food shelves in Sainsbury's store in Bangor, Co Down. Boris Johnson has admitted there are "teething problems" in the post-Brexit trade relationship between Great Britain and Northern Ireland as industry experts warned there could be fresh shortages on supermarket shelves.
Depleted shelves are seen in a Sainsbury's supermarket at the Forestside shopping centre in Belfast, Monday, Jan. 11, 2021. The U.K.’s biggest supermarket chains warned Wednesday, Jan. 13 that food supplies in Northern Ireland face disruption because of new checks imposed by Britain’s departure from the European Union. After photos emerged showing empty shelves, the chief executives of Tesco, Sainsbury's, Asda, Iceland, Co-Op and Marks & Spencer wrote to the government saying there would be “significant disruption” unless urgent action was taken to fix an “unworkable” system. (David Young/PA via AP)
A motorist passes an anti Brexit poster on the Irish border between Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, close to the village of Jonnesborough Thursday, Dec. 31, 2020. (AP Photo/Peter Morrison)
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"It was made very clear to us by the suppliers to both hospitals and schools that if the current arrangement for supermarkets isn't extended in a few months' time that they will not be able to supply our hospitals and schools with food," he told BBC Radio Ulster's Nolan Show.

"That is a major crisis and I have raised this with (senior Cabinet minister) Michael Gove.

"Seriously, are we going to have a situation where our hospitals and schools are not able to feed the children at school, they're not able to feed their patients?

"That is an outrageous situation that we in Northern Ireland have been put in as a result of the protocol negotiated between the UK Government and the European Union."

Under the terms of the Northern Ireland Protocol, the region has remained in the single market for goods. That requires strict health checks on animal-based food products being shipped from Great Britain.

Some products are prohibited from entering Northern Ireland at all under single market rules.

Sausages and other chilled meats, which are on that banned list, have been granted a six-month grace period to enable their import from GB to continue until June using temporary Export Health Certificates.

Northern Ireland also applies EU customs rules at its ports, requiring customs declarations on goods moving from GB.

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Lorries arriving into Northern Ireland from Great Britain face new checks as a result of Brexit (Liam McBurney/PA)

Mr Poots rejected suggestions his party was partly to blame for the situation, given its support for Brexit and its opposition to the withdrawal deal negotiated by former prime minister Theresa May.

Mrs May's version of Brexit did not include the same economic barriers on GB-NI trade, with the Northern Ireland Protocol later negotiated by her successor Boris Johnson.

Mr Poots insisted those who advocated the protocol, as a means to keep trade flowing freely across the Irish border, should shoulder responsibility for the "unmitigated failure" of the new trading arrangements.

He singled out the Irish Government, Sinn Fein, the SDLP and Alliance Party for criticism.

Senior DUP figures have urged the UK Government to invoke the Article 16 mechanism within the Northern Ireland Protocol to halt its operation.

The Prime Minister has said he will not hesitate to invoke the article if the protocol is causing economic harm, however he has characterised the disruption witnessed since the end of the transition period as "teething problems".

Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis has denied the existence of a new Irish Sea trade border.

Sinn Fein MP Chris Hazzard accused Mr Poots of "talking up a problem".

"He's peddling panic needlessly to divert the gaze of angry supporters who are angry at Irish Sea Border," he tweeted.

Poots on @BBCNolan talking up a problem despite the fact that officials from his department DAERA, DEFRA & EU have agreed a solution in recent days & will test in days ahead

He's peddling panic needlessly to divert the gaze of angry supporters who are angry at Irish Sea Border

— Chris Hazzard (@ChrisHazzardSF) January 14, 2021

Earlier, DUP MP Sir Jeffrey Donaldson warned that the disruption risked breaching the terms of the Good Friday Agreement.

Sir Jeffrey told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "The protocol is damaging the Northern Ireland economy and if it damages the Northern Ireland economy it actually undermines the Good Friday Agreement.

"And furthermore, that agreement makes clear that Northern Ireland will remain an integral part of the United Kingdom unless the people of Northern Ireland vote otherwise.

"Therefore this breaches a fundamental element of the Good Friday Agreement by increasingly separating Northern Ireland from Great Britain in trading terms – our biggest trading partner, our biggest trading market, and that simply doesn't help anyone in Northern Ireland."

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