Rule, Britannia! and Land Of Hope And Glory to be sung at Proms after BBC U-turn

PA

The BBC has performed a U-turn over its decision to host instrumental versions of Rule, Britannia! and Land Of Hope And Glory at the Last Night of the Proms.

The songs will now feature a select group of vocalists following controversy over the lyrics’ perceived historical links with colonialism and slavery.

Musicians are performing live at the Royal Albert Hall – but without an audience due to coronavirus restrictions – across the final two weeks of the season, ending in the much-talked about Last Night.

Cabinet Meeting
Cabinet Meeting

The run-up to the Last Night has seen musicians, media industry figures and even Prime Minister Boris Johnson weigh into the debate over the pieces.

A spokesperson for the BBC Proms said: “The pandemic means a different Proms this year and one of the consequences, under Covid-19 restrictions, is we are not able to bring together massed voices.

“For that reason, we took the artistic decision not to sing Rule, Britannia! and Land Of Hope And Glory in the Hall.

“We have been looking hard at what else might be possible and we have a solution.

“Both pieces will now include a select group of BBC singers. This means the words will be sung in the Hall, and as we have always made clear, audiences will be free to sing along at home.

Pleased to see common sense has prevailed on the BBC Proms

— Oliver Dowden (@OliverDowden) September 2, 2020

“While it can’t be a full choir, and we are unable to have audiences in the Hall, we are doing everything possible to make it special and want a Last Night truly to remember.

“We hope everyone will welcome this solution. We think the night itself will be a very special moment for the country – and one that is much needed after a difficult period for everyone.

“It will not be a usual Last Night, but it will be a night not just to look forward to, but to remember.”

The BBC’s former director-general Lord Tony Hall previously insisted the decision to remove the lyrics was a “creative” one.

But he confirmed that the issue of dropping songs because of their association with Britain’s imperial past had been discussed.

The decision comes after Lord Hall was succeeded in the role by Tim Davie.

Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Secretary Oliver Dowden reacted to the news tweeting: “Pleased to see common sense has prevailed on the BBC Proms.”