Parts of the UK expected to be hotter than mainland Europe on Friday

Disappointed holiday-goers may take some comfort from the weekend forecast, as the Met Office predicts that parts of the UK will be hotter than mainland Europe.

The Met Office says it expects Friday to be the hottest day of the year so far with temperatures even nudging into 35C (95F) in Greater London.

Popular tourist spots on the continent including Ibiza, Lisbon and Berlin fall short of the UK high, reaching 33C (91.4F), 30C (86F) and 25C (77F) respectively.

Back home the hot weather will be widespread across south eastern areas in Kent and Cambridgeshire, where temperatures will stay around 33-34C (93.2F).

Manchester is expected to peak at 32C (89.6F) and parts of Wales will also reach 30C (86F).

A spokesman for the Met added that popular south-coast destinations such as Devon, Cornwall will stay “fresher”, with temperatures peaking in the mid 20s, and sunseekers in Brighton will enjoy a pleasant 28C (82.4F) high.

But the good weather is expected to be short-lived and will not extend into the three-day “heatwave territory”.

Northern Ireland will be caught by a slow moving weather front on Friday, keeping temperatures at a balmy 22C (71.6F), that will go on to cool the rest of the UK on Saturday.

The front will result in temperature drops of up to 10C overnight with highs of 26C (78.8F) and 21C (69.8F) in London and Manchester respectively, on Saturday.

The UK average temperature for this July is currently on course to be just 14.1C (57.4F), one degree less than the 1981-2010 long-term average of 15.2C (59.4F), data from the Met shows.

Summer weather July 30th 2020
Visitors are bathed in sunshine as they walk through Regent’s Park, London.

So far this month, the highest maximum temperature recorded was 28.5C (83.3F) on July 17 at Heathrow Airport.

The UK has already surpassed 100% of the average monthly rainfall and only experienced two thirds (66%) of the expected sunshine for an average July, a total of 113.4 hours, Met Office figures show.

“We’ve not seen a temperature anywhere above 30 so far or even with a three in it, that is quite unusual for July,” a Met spokesman said.

“In terms of shifting the overall weather stats for the month, it’s not going to do much to the average.”

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