Britain will not 'look away' from Hong Kong responsibilities, says Raab

Britain will not look away from its responsibilities to Hong Kong, foreign minister Dominic Raab said on Sunday, repeating London's offer of extended visa rights in response to China's push to impose a new law in the former British colony.

"If China follows through with this national security legislation ... we will give those people who hold BNO passports (British National Overseas' passports) the right to come to the UK," Raab told the BBC, adding that only "a fraction of them would actually come".

"We are not going to turn a blind eye, we are not going to look away from our responsbilities to the people of Hong Kong."

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HONG KONG, CHINA - MAY 27: Riot police mass detain pro-democracy protesters during a rally in Causeway Bay district on May 27, 2020 in Hong Kong, China. Chinese Premier Li Keqiang said on Friday during the National People's Congress that Beijing would establish a sound legal system and enforcement mechanism for safeguarding national security in Hong Kong.(Photo by Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)
Protesters of all ages are continuing to show support for Hong Kongs democracy movement despite China approving a National Security Law on the former British colony, Central, Hong Kong, May 29th, 2020. (Photo by Tommy Walker/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
A protester holding up Hong Kong Independence flag, Lunch with You event, IFC Mall, Central, Hong Kong, May 29th, 2020. The event 'Lunch with you' took place once again in IFC Mall on Friday lunchtime, as protesters gathered chanting slogans and waving flags. (Photo by Tommy Walker/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Protesters hold up a banner in IFC Mall 'Hong Kong Independence' during a lunchtime demonstration on Friday 29th May 2020. The event 'Lunch with you' took place once again in IFC Mall on Friday lunchtime, as protesters gathered chanting slogans and waving flags. (Photo by Tommy Walker/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
People visit a bar in Hong Kong on May 29, 2020. - The United States and Britain on May 29 defied China's anger by raising Hong Kong's autonomy at the UN Security Council as President Donald Trump prepared new measures against Beijing. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP) (Photo by ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images)
People (back) stand at a booth where passersby can give their signatures in support of a new security law in Hong Kong on May 29, 2020. - China faced growing international pressure May 29 over its move to impose a security law on Hong Kong that critics say will destroy the city's autonomy, with the United States and Britain placing the issue before the UN Security Council. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP) (Photo by ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images)
HONG KONG, CHINA - MAY29: Pro-democracy supporters gather at a shopping mall during a Lunch With You rally on May 29, 2020 in Hong Kong, China. Chinese Premier Li Keqiang said on Friday during the National People's Congress that Beijing would establish a sound legal system and enforcement mechanism for safeguarding national security in Hong Kong. (Photo by Billy H.C. Kwok/Getty Images)
This photo taken on May 28, 2020 shows a visitor gesturing the protest slogan "Five demands and not one less" as she poses next to the new "Lady Liberty" statue during an exhibition named "We Are Not __" in Hong Kong. - The new statue shows a female protester with her hands pushing both the ceiling and the floor in what the team says is a posture that signifies Hong Kongers' struggle. The original one depicted a female protester in a gas mask, protective goggles and helmet, an umbrella in one hand and a black flag in the other, proclaiming the protest slogan "Liberate Hong Kong, revolution of our times". It was a regular feature at the larger, more peaceful rallies last summer, eliciting cheers when it was wheeled in by volunteers and transported around the city on the back of a truck. Pro-democracy protesters hauled the four-metre statue to the top of a famous Hong Kong mountain early on October 13 last year, announcing the peak would be its "final resting place". It was soon vandalised and torn down. (Photo by Anthony WALLACE / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY MENTION OF THE ARTIST UPON PUBLICATION - TO ILLUSTRATE THE EVENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE CAPTION (Photo by ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images)
Police raise the blue flag in warning to gathering protesters during lunchtime street demonstrations in Central, Hong Kong Island, Hong Kong, May 27th, 2020 (Photo by Tommy Walker/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Hong Kong Police detain an office worker during Wednesdays lunchtime street demonstrations within the SAR, Hong Kong, May 27th, 2020. (Photo by Tommy Walker/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
HONG KONG, CHINA - MAY 28: Hong Kong protesters attend a rally in a shopping mall on May 28, 2020 in Hong Kong, China. Chinese Premier Li Keqiang said on Friday during the National People's Congress that Beijing would establish a sound legal system and enforcement mechanism for safeguarding national security in Hong Kong. (Photo by Billy H.C. Kwok/Getty Images)
HONG KONG, CHINA - 2020/05/27: A woman passes by riot police officers while speaking on her phone during the demonstration. Protesting against a bill that would criminalise insulting the Chinese national anthem, demonstrators marched on the streets and chanted songs and slogans. Later, police in riot gear appeared and fired pepper spray, arresting several protesters. (Photo by Willie Siau/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
HONG KONG, CHINA - 2020/05/27: First aid volunteers take care of a boy who has been shot directly into the face with pepper spray during the demonstrations. A new wave of protests rise in Hong Kong at the news that the Chinese government will unilaterally pass the National Security Law 23. (Photo by Emilio Navas/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
HONG KONG, CHINA - 2020/05/27: Police advance in Mongkok with the illegal assembly notice banner during the demonstrations. A new wave of protests rise in Hong Kong at the news that the Chinese government will unilaterally pass the National Security Law 23. (Photo by Emilio Navas/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
MONG KOK, HONG KONG - 2020/05/27: Protesters gesture with five fingers raised, signifying five demands, not one less during an anti-government protest in Mong Kok. Hundreds of protesters shouted pro-democracy slogans and insults at police in Hong Kong as lawmakers debated a bill criminalizing abuse of the Chinese national anthem in the city. (Photo by Tang Yan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
HONG KONG, CHINA - 2020/05/27: A pro National Security bill lady dressed in red being escorted to leave the Causeway Bay area by a district councillor after having an argument with members of the press as she accused the the press being traitors of China. The Hong Kong Police has made over 360 arrests as thousands of pro democracy demonstrators took to the streets of Hong Kong to protest against the proposed Nation Security Bill by the Beijing central government. (Photo by Geovien So/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)
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In other news, China's state media and the government of Hong Kong lashed out on Sunday at U.S. President Donald Trump's vow to end Hong Kong's special status if Beijing imposes new national security laws on the city, which is bracing for fresh protests.

Trump on Friday pledged to "take action to revoke Hong Kong's preferential treatment as a separate customs and travel territory", and to impose sanctions on unspecified individuals over Beijing's new laws on the Asian financial centre.

But China's state media pushed back, saying this would hurt the United States more than China.

"The baton of sanctions that the United States is brandishing will not scare Hong Kong and will not bring China down," China's Communist Party mouthpiece, the People's Daily, wrote in a commentary. It used the pen name "Zhong Sheng", meaning "Voice of China", often used to give the paper's view on foreign policy issues.

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