Sunak pledges £30 billion stimulus to combat coronavirus outbreak

A £30 billion package to stimulate the economy was announced by Chancellor Rishi Sunak as the Government and Bank of England sought to protect jobs and livelihoods against the coronavirus crisis.

The Chancellor acknowledged the British people were worried about the threat posed by the virus "but they are not daunted".

Mr Sunak said there was "likely to be a temporary disruption" to the economy as a result of coronavirus but insisted his plans would bring "stability and security".

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Rishi Sunak delivers his first Budget
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Rishi Sunak delivers his first Budget
Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak stands outside No 11 Downing Street and holds up the traditional red box that contains the budget speech for the media, he will then leave to make budget speech to House of Commons, in London, Wednesday, March 11, 2020. Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce the first budget since Britain left the European Union. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak, centre, stands outside No 11 Downing Street and holds up the traditional red box that contains the budget speech for the media, he will then leave to make budget speech to House of Commons, in London, Wednesday, March 11, 2020. Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce the first budget since Britain left the European Union. Sunak is flanked by his team of treasury ministers . (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak stands outside No 11 Downing Street as he holds the traditional red box that contains the budget speech for the media, he will then leave to make budget speech to House of Commons, in London, Wednesday, March 11, 2020. Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce the first budget since Britain left the European Union. His ministerial team are seen leaving right. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak waves to the media as he stands outside No 11 Downing Street and holds up the traditional red box that contains the budget speech, he will then leave to make budget speech to House of Commons, in London, Wednesday, March 11, 2020. Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce the first budget since Britain left the European Union. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Police remove a climate change protestor from the road during a demonstration on the budget outside Parliament in London, Wednesday, March 11, 2020. Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce the first budget since Britain left the European Union. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
A man dressed as the Chancellor of the Exchequer holds a facsimile of the budget box with a message 'treasure the earth' and a woman dressed as the Speaker of the House of Commons holds a sign as they participate in a demonstration on the budget outside Parliament in London, Wednesday, March 11, 2020. Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce the first budget since Britain left the European Union. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
Police remove a climate change protestor from the road during a demonstration on the budget outside Parliament in London, Wednesday, March 11, 2020. Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce the first budget since Britain left the European Union. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak walks from No 11 Downing Street as he holds the traditional red box that contains the budget speech for the media, he will then leave to make budget speech to House of Commons, in London, Wednesday, March 11, 2020. Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce the first budget since Britain left the European Union. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak walks from No 11 Downing Street as he holds the traditional red box that contains the budget speech for the media, he will then leave to make budget speech to House of Commons, in London, Wednesday, March 11, 2020. Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce the first budget since Britain left the European Union. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
A facsimile of the budget box with a message 'treasure the earth' sits among other protest signs prior to a demonstration on the budget outside Parliament in London, Wednesday, March 11, 2020. Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak will announce the first budget since Britain left the European Union. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
Chancellor Rishi Sunak (centre) outside 11 Downing Street, London, before heading to the House of Commons to deliver his Budget.
Chancellor Rishi Sunak (left) meeting with the Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney in Downing Street, London, before heading to the House of Commons to deliver his Budget.
Chancellor Rishi Sunak delivers his Budget in the House of Commons, London.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson (left) alongside Chancellor Rishi Sunak during Prime Minister's Questions in the House of Commons, London.
Chancellor Rishi Sunak outside 11 Downing Street, London, before heading to the House of Commons to deliver his Budget.
Larry the cat outside 11 Downing Street, London, as Chancellor Rishi Sunak heads to the House of Commons to deliver his Budget.
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Measures set out by the Chancellor included:

– A £1 billion business rates holiday for retail, leisure and hospitality firms with a rateable value of under £51,000

– The Government will fully meet the cost of providing statutory sick pay for up to 14 days for workers in firms with up to 250 employees, providing over £2 billion for up to two million businesses.

– Reforms to the benefits system to make it easier to access funds will provide a £500 million boost to the welfare system, along with a £500 million hardship fund

– A £3,000 cash grant to businesses eligible for small business rates relief

Mr Sunak said: "Taken together, the extraordinary measures I have set out today represent £7 billion to support the self-employed, businesses and vulnerable people.

"To support the NHS and other public services, I am also setting aside a £5 billion emergency response fund – and will go further if necessary."

Other plans represented another £18 billion of "additional fiscal loosening" and "that means I am announcing today, in total, a £30 billion fiscal stimulus to support British people, British jobs and British businesses through this moment".

Hours before the Budget, the Bank of England set the scene with an emergency interest rate cut from 0.75% to 0.25% and a series of other measures designed to help businesses and households through a coronavirus economic shock "that could prove sharp and large, but should be temporary".

Budget 2020

Chancellor Rishi Sunak posed with members of his Treasury team outside 11 Downing Street before heading to the House of Commons to deliver his Budget (Victoria Jones/PA)Mr Sunak said: "I know how worried people are. Worried about their health, the health of their loved ones, their jobs, their income, their businesses, their financial security.

"And I know they get even more worried when they turn on their TVs and hear talk of markets collapsing and recessions coming. People want to know what's happening, and what can be done to fix it.

"What everyone needs to know is that we are doing everything we can to keep this country, and our people, healthy and financially secure."

He added: "We will get through this – together. The British people may be worried, but they are not daunted.

"We will protect our country and our people. We will rise to this challenge."

The Chancellor said that without accounting for the impact of coronavirus, the Office for Budget Responsibility has forecast growth of 1.1% in 2020 , 1.8% in 2021 and then 1.5%, 1.3%, and 1.4% in the following years.

Despite speculation that he would ditch the framework on spending set by predecessor Sajid Javid, Mr Sunak said that his Budget is delivered "not just within the fiscal rules of the manifesto but with room to spare".

He also announced that fuel duty would be frozen for another year and there would also be no increase in duties on acoholic drinks.

And he announced an increase in the National Insurance threshold from £8,632 to £9,500, which he said would be worth £100 a year to 31 million people.

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