Just 22% of Brits think Tony Blair was good for Labour

Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair speaks during an interview with Axel Threlfall at a Reuters Newsmaker event on "The challenging state of British politics" in London, Britain, November 25, 2019. REUTERS/Toby Melville

Just 22% of Britons think Tony Blair had a positive effect on the Labour Party, according to a poll.

The YouGov survey was taken on Thursday, the same day as Blair offered his advice to the party by saying it needs a "head-to-toe renewal" and claiming he would have stopped Brexit and "united the country".

Some 4,584 Brits were interviewed in the wake of the speech and only 22% said he had a positive effect on Labour, with 38% saying he had a negative effect.

The figures were similar with only Labour voters taken into account: 26% labelling him positive and 38% negative.

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Tony Blair in recent years
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Tony Blair in recent years
Former prime minister Tony Blair during a speech to mark the 120th anniversary of the founding of the Labour party, in the Great Hall at King's College, London.
Former prime minister Tony Blair, arrives for the funeral of Frank Dobson at St Pancras Church in London.
Former Prime Minister Tony Blair on stage during the Final Say rally at the Mermaid Theatre, London.
Former Prime Minister Tony Blair in Downing Street arriving for the Remembrance Sunday service at the Cenotaph memorial in Whitehall, central London.
File photo dated 02/09/19 of former prime minister Tony Blair, who has said Tory and Labour MPs would both face a "big risk" by fighting a general election on the issue of Brexit.
Former prime minister Tony Blair, during a Service of Thanksgiving for the life and work of Lord Ashdown at Westminster Abbey in London.
Former prime minister Tony Blair gives a speech at the Institute for Government in central London where he will call for Labour to oppose any move by Boris Johnson to hold an emergency general election until Brexit has been resolved.
Prime Minister Theresa May speaks alongside former prime ministers David Cameron, Tony Blair, and Gordon Brown and former leader of the Liberal Democrats Nick Clegg during a service of thanksgiving for the life and work of former Cabinet Secretary Lord Heywood at Westminster Abbey in London.
Former prime minister Tony Blair with Prime Minister Theresa May as they leave following a service of thanksgiving for the life and work of former Cabinet Secretary Lord Heywood at Westminster Abbey in London.
Former prime minister Tony Blair makes a speech on Brexit at the British Academy in London.
Former Prime Minister Tony Blair during the remembrance service at the Cenotaph memorial in Whitehall, central London, on the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice which marked the end of the First World War.
Lisbon, 07/11/2018 - Web Summit 2018 was held at the Altice Arena in Lisbon from 5 to 8 November. Tony Blair (Filipe Amorim / Global Imagens)
Former prime minister Tony Blair speaking at the launch of the Resolution Foundation's annual Living Standards Audit in central London.
Former prime minister Tony Blair arrives to give a speech on poverty and inequality at the launch of the Resolution Foundation's annual Living Standards Audit in central London.
Former Prime Minister Tony Blair talking about the Good Friday Agreement in London.
Former Prime Minister Tony Blair in conversation with Professor Anand Menon during the Changing Europe conference on Brexit in central London.
Former Prime Minister Tony Blair speaking during the Changing Europe conference on Brexit in central London.
Former Prime Minister Tony Blair and his wife Cherie walk through Downing Street on their way to the annual Remembrance Sunday Service at the Cenotaph memorial in Whitehall, central London.
Tony Blair addresses a conference on Brexit in the Druids Glen Hotel, Wicklow, Ireland.
Tony Blair at a Brexit meeting in Wicklow, Ireland.
Former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Tony Blair addressing the 2017 American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference in Washington, D.C. on March 26, 2017. (Photo by Michael Brochstein) *** Please Use Credit from Credit Field ***
Former Prime Minister Tony Blair during his speech on Brexit at an Open Britain event in central London.
Former Prime Minister Tony Blair holds a press conference at Admiralty House, London, where responding to the Chilcot report he said: "I express more sorrow, regret and apology than you may ever know or can believe."
Former prime minister Tony Blair and wife Cherie arrive at St Paul's Cathedral in London for a national service of thanksgiving to celebrate the 90th birthday of Queen Elizabeth II.
Former prime ministers Sir John Major (left) and Tony Blair walk across the Peace Bridge in Londonderry following a Remain campaign event at the University of Ulster in Londonderry.
Former prime minister Tony Blair during a Remain campaign event at the University of Ulster in Londonderry.
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Even Remain voters – Blair was one of the leading "stop Brexit" voices before Boris Johnson's landslide election win – were lukewarm towards the man who was prime minister between 1997 and 2007.

Just 31% of europhiles said he had a positive effect, with another 31% saying he had a negative effect.

Blair says all Labour leadership contenders 'significant improvement' on Corbyn

The figures reflect just how a divisive figure Blair remains among the UK public, despite being the only Labour leader to win a general election since 1974.

Earlier on Wednesday, he said of Brexit at a King's College London event marking 120 years since Labour was founded: "I don't think you can ever unite the country over Brexit. You can unite them after Brexit.

"So, if we had stopped Brexit, which I think we could have done if we had a serious opposition, I would have said you immediately would have to deal with all the problems that gave rise to [people voting for] Brexit.

"You would have to take a whole series of measures to make sure you are pulling those people back towards you, having alienated them by not doing Brexit.

"What Boris Johnson is doing is wrapping it around the other way: 'I'm going to do Brexit and reach out to all these northern places, and we're going to try and keep those Brexit people with us.'"

- This article first appeared on Yahoo

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