Prime Minister facing questions over how controversial No 10 aide was hired

Labour has written to the Prime Minister asking him if he agreed with a former aide's controversial views on black people and about forcing contraception on the working classes.

Party chiefs have also called for answers on how Andrew Sabisky, who resigned this week after his "offensive" past writings were discovered online, came to be hired to work in Downing Street.

Mr Sabisky, who once suggested enforcing the uptake of contraception to stop unplanned pregnancies from creating a "permanent underclass", announced he was standing down on Monday evening.

He said he did not want to be a distraction to the Government after previous comments made by him, including that black people had IQs that were "close to the typical boundary for mild mental retardation", were unearthed.

Ministers said Mr Sabisky "jumped before he was pushed" following a slew of "reprehensible" past comments, but Labour has demanded answers about how such a figure came to be employed by Downing Street.

Labour chair Ian Lavery, in his letter to Boris Johnson demanding more information on the level of vetting involved, wrote: "Andrew Sabisky has thankfully left your Government.

"However, the disturbing nature of his previous comments on eugenics, race and women, which have been well documented in the press, raise very serious concerns about your own views.

"Furthermore, there are unanswered questions about how somehow with such abhorrent views was ever considered for employment in the first place."

Mr Lavery pointed to an article published in The Spectator magazine when Mr Johnson was editor which said "Orientals...have larger brains and higher IQ scores. Blacks are at the other pole", and asked whether the PM agreed with Mr Sabisky's views on ethnic minorities.

The Labour MP added: "Boris Johnson has serious questions to answer about how this appointment was made and whether he agrees with his vile views."

Mr Sabisky, when announcing he was quitting, described media reports about his previously-aired opinions as "mad".

But Business Minister Kwasi Kwarteng blasted Mr Sabisky's past remarks as "offensive" and "racist", and alleged the aide walked out on the Government before he could be sacked.

Mr Kwarteng told Sky News he thought the Government would be "looking at vetting processes more closely" in light of the drama.

It comes as veteran politician Ken Clarke called on Mr Johnson to rein in his chief adviser Dominic Cummings following his plan to recruit "misfits and weirdos" into Number 10.

The former Tory chancellor said the brains behind the Vote Leave campaign would would only last in the job if his "personal appearances stop" and he goes back to being a "back room operator".

Dominic Cummings
Dominic Cummings called for 'misfits and weirdos' to apply to work in Number 10 (David Mirzoeff/PA)

Mr Cummings made headlines before the Cabinet reshuffle when, in tongue-in-cheek fashion, he told broadcast reporters that cartoon superheroes would do a better job than Mr Johnson's then-current crop of close circle ministers.

"PJ Masks will do a greater job than all of them put together," he said, when about the reshuffle.

But Mr Clarke told ITV News' Acting Prime Minister podcast that former chief advisers did not "dress exotically and pose for the photographers before giving, quite blatantly, briefings all over the place about what their views are on everything".

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Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Number 10 special advisor Dominic Cummings arrives at 10 Downing Street in central London on December 16, 2019. - Prime Minister Boris Johnson vowed Saturday to repay the trust of former opposition voters who gave his Conservatives a mandate to take Britain out of the European Union next month. Johnson toured a leftist bastion once represented by former Labour leader Tony Blair in a bid to show his intent to unite the country after years of divisions over Brexit. (Photo by DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS / AFP) (Photo by DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP via Getty Images)
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The new chancellor has been branded a 'Dominic Cummings (left) stooge' by John McDonnell. (PA Images)
Prime Minister Boris Johnson's key adviser Dominic Cummings leaving his north London home following yesterday's Cabinet reshuffle. (Photo by David Mirzoeff/PA Images via Getty Images)
Dominic Cummings says cartoon superheroes PJ Masks could do better job than current cabinet
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his advisor Dominic Cummings, left, leave 10 Downing Street in London, and get in a car together to go to the Houses of Parliament, Monday, Oct. 28, 2019. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson says it's Parliament's fault, not his, that Britain will not be leaving the European Union as scheduled on Oct. 31. The EU has agreed to postpone Brexit until Jan. 31, 2020, after Johnson failed to get British lawmakers to ratify his divorce deal with the bloc in time to leave this week. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Sacked aide launches unfair dismissal claim after Dominic Cummings had her frogmarched out of Downing Street
Call for Dominic Cummings to appear before parliamentary committee
Rishi Sunak could find decisions on economic policy being made in 10 Downing Street under Boris Johnson and Dominic Cummings.
Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Senior political aide Dominic Cummings speaks to Stuart Wheeler, at his book launch for Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics, at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Stuart Wheeler (left) with Dominic Cummings at the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Pro remain campaigner Steve Bray interviews Dominic Cummings as he arrives at the Cabinet office in London,United Kingdom on 22nd August 2019. (photo by Claire Doherty/In Pictures via Getty Images)
Dominic Cummings arrives in Downing Street, London.
Senior aide to the prime minister Dominic Cummings leaves following a cabinet meeting at 10 Downing Street, London.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson with his senior aid Dominic Cummings as they leave Downing Street, central London.
Senior aide to the prime minister Dominic Cummings, in Downing Street in Westminster, London.
Dominic Cummings, special advisor for Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, leaves his home in London, Britain, September 2, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
Dominic Cummings, special advisor for Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, leaves his home in London, Britain, September 2, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
Dominic Cummings, special advisor for Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, leaves his home in London, Britain, August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
LONDON, ENGLAND - AUGUST 7: Dominic Cummings, special advisor to Prime Minister Boris Johnson arrives at 10 Downing Street on August 7, 2019 in London, England. (Photo by Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images)
Number 10 Chief of Staff Dominic Cummings arrives at Downing Street in central London on August 2, 2019. (Photo by Tolga AKMEN / AFP) (Photo credit should read TOLGA AKMEN/AFP/Getty Images)
Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
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Leaving his house on Tuesday morning, Mr Cummings suggested people should read about "super-forecasters".

He told awaiting reporters: "Read Philip Tetlock's Superforecasters instead of political pundits who don't know what they're talking about."

Superforecasting is a book by Philip Tetlock on the science of prediction.

Mr Sabisky – a self-professed "geopolitical forecaster" – wrote on Mr Cummings' website in 2014: "One way to get around the problems of unplanned pregnancies creating a permanent underclass would be to legally enforce universal uptake of long-term contraception at the onset of puberty.

"Vaccination laws give it a precedent, I would argue."

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