Dominic Cummings calls for ‘weirdos’ to apply for Downing Street jobs

Boris Johnson's key adviser Dominic Cummings has called for "weirdos" to apply for jobs in Downing Street as he seeks to overhaul decision-making in Government.

Mr Cummings posted an apparent job advert on Thursday saying Number 10 wants to hire an "unusual set of people with different skills and backgrounds" to work as special advisers and potentially officials.

The blog post exceeding 2,900 words came amid reports that the Prime Minister is planning "seismic changes" to the civil service.

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Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Senior political aide Dominic Cummings speaks to Stuart Wheeler, at his book launch for Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics, at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Stuart Wheeler (left) with Dominic Cummings at the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Pro remain campaigner Steve Bray interviews Dominic Cummings as he arrives at the Cabinet office in London,United Kingdom on 22nd August 2019. (photo by Claire Doherty/In Pictures via Getty Images)
Dominic Cummings arrives in Downing Street, London.
Senior aide to the prime minister Dominic Cummings leaves following a cabinet meeting at 10 Downing Street, London.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson with his senior aid Dominic Cummings as they leave Downing Street, central London.
Senior aide to the prime minister Dominic Cummings, in Downing Street in Westminster, London.
Dominic Cummings, special advisor for Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, leaves his home in London, Britain, September 2, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
Dominic Cummings, special advisor for Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, leaves his home in London, Britain, September 2, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
Dominic Cummings, special advisor for Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, leaves his home in London, Britain, August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
LONDON, ENGLAND - AUGUST 7: Dominic Cummings, special advisor to Prime Minister Boris Johnson arrives at 10 Downing Street on August 7, 2019 in London, England. (Photo by Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images)
Number 10 Chief of Staff Dominic Cummings arrives at Downing Street in central London on August 2, 2019. (Photo by Tolga AKMEN / AFP) (Photo credit should read TOLGA AKMEN/AFP/Getty Images)
Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
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Mr Cummings, a former Vote Leave director, said he hopes to be made "largely redundant" within a year by the recruitment drive.

He called for officials including "weirdos and misfits with odd skills", data scientists and policy experts to apply to a gmail account if they think they fit the bill.

Mr Cummings warned that there is "some profound problems at the core of how the British state makes decisions" and that he currently makes decisions "well outside" his "circle of competence".

And he says the need for change comes with Brexit requiring large policy and decision-making structure changes and a Government with an 80-strong majority having "little need to worry about short-term unpopularity".

Under a subsection on hiring "super-talented weirdos", he writes that the Government needs "some true wild cards, artists, people who never went to university and fought their way out of an appalling hell hole".

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Prime Minister Boris Johnson with his senior aide Dominic Cummings (Victoria Jones/PA)

Mr Cummings' post came after Rachel Wolf, who helped draw up the blueprint of Tory election pledges, said civil servants could be made to take regular exams to prove they are up to their Whitehall jobs.

Under "seismic" changes being planned by Number 10, she also said that civil servants are "woefully unprepared" for sweeping reforms that Mr Johnson is keen to push through.

Dave Penman, the general secretary of the FDA, which represents senior civil servants, warned that the PM's allies are exhibiting a "fundamental misunderstanding" of the modern civil service.

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