#DieInADitchDay: PM mocked as October 31 Brexit deadline passes

British Twitter was a mix of jokes and jeers on the day the country was due, for the second time, to leave the European Union.

After the UK’s departure was put back once again this week, many took the opportunity to mock Boris Johnson – who previously pledged he would rather be “dead in a ditch” than extend Brexit beyond Halloween.

One tweeter, Richard Clift, urged fellow users to “check your local ditch” for the PM, adding that he had checked one on the Wirral and not found him.

Another, named Dawn Townsend, implored people to “take care when cleaning out your ditches”.

“If you discover a prime minister, don’t worry too much,” she added. “He will be gone by 13th December.”

#DieInADitchDay was soon trending on Twitter, as was #BritainHasExploded – a reference to Brexiteer Mark Francois’ claim that the country would explode if the EU exit did not take place by Halloween.

Twitter user @DevonDad was one of many to poke fun at the claim.

“I awoke to discover a fork in the knife section… absolute scenes here!” he wrote.

Richard May shared a picture of an empty PG Tips box, adding: “Oh sweet Jesus, it’s happening!”

Some on the opposite side of the political divide still found humour in the situation, with the Brexit Party sharing a mock missed delivery letter from Parliament which read: “Sorry, your Brexit hasn’t been delivered.”

It added: “Sorry we missed you, we will try to redeliver your Brexit by 31st January 2020. We apologise for any inconvenience. Regards, Parliament.”

Pro-Brexit campaign group Leave.EU was similarly scathing.

“And they say politicians don’t keep their promises…”

However many were not treating the Brexit delay as a laughing matter.

“I’m sure we’re supposed to be leaving the EU today? I even booked the day off work to celebrate!” tweeted @LiamTuffs.

“How bitterly disappointing to have been ignored & let down by our government… AGAIN!”

Others seemed pleased, though.

“Happy #BrexitDay!” tweeted @RobDrummond. “May all future Brexit Days contain as little actual Brexit as today.”

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