Prince Harry snaps at reporter after she asks unscheduled question: 'Don't behave like this'

Prince Harry snapped at a seasoned royals reporter during the final days of his royal tour of Africa.

While leaving a health centre during his solo trip to Malawi, Harry had a tense exchange with Sky News journalist Rhiannon Mills after she asked him a so-called "unscheduled question."

"That short conversation, what do you hope to achieve through it?" Mills asked Harry after he spoke to health officials at the Mauwa Health Centre.

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Royal visit to Africa
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Royal visit to Africa
The Duke of Sussex makes a speech at a reception at the British High Commissioner�s Residence in Lilongwe, Malawi.
The Duke of Sussex speaks to Angeline Murimirwa, the Executive Director of Africa CAMFED, during his visit to the Nalikule College of Education in Malawi on day seven of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duchess of Sussex appears on a television screen as she speaks via skype during the Duke of Sussex's visit to the Nalikule College of Education in Lilongwe, Malawi, to see the work of the CAMA network supporting young women in Malawi.
The Duke of Sussex arrives at the Nalikule College of Education to learn about the CAMA network and how it is supporting young women in Malawi on day seven of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex sings with the CAMA choir during a visit to the Nalikule College of Education in Lilongwe, Malawi, to see the work of the CAMA network supporting young women in Malawi.
The Duke of Sussex sings with the CAMA choir during a visit to the Nalikule College of Education in Lilongwe, Malawi, to see the work of the CAMA network supporting young women in Malawi.
The Duke of Sussex walks on Princess Diana Street in Huambo, Angola, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. The Duke is visiting the minefield where his late mother, the Princess of Wales, was photographed in 1997, which is now a busy street with schools, shops and houses.
Photo by: KGC-178/STAR MAX/IPx 2019 9/28/19 Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex, ties a ribbon at the memorial to student Uyinene Mrwetyana at the post office where she was raped and murdered last month. A post on the official Instagram account of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex said "The Duke and Duchess had been following what had happened from afar and were both eager to learn more when they arrived in South Africa." These images were posted on @SussexRoyal today and supplied by the Royal Household.
Photo by: KGC-178/STAR MAX/IPx 2019 9/28/19 Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex, ties a ribbon at the memorial to student Uyinene Mrwetyana at the post office where she was raped and murdered last month. A post on the official Instagram account of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex said "The Duke and Duchess had been following what had happened from afar and were both eager to learn more when they arrived in South Africa." These images were posted on @SussexRoyal today and supplied by the Royal Household.
The Duke of Sussex arrives for an audience with President Jo�o Louren�o at the presidential palace in Luanda, Angola on day six of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex in front of the Diana Tree in Huambo, Angola, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. The Duke is visiting the minefield where his late mother, the Princess of Wales, was photographed in 1997, which is now a busy street with schools, shops and houses.
The Duke of Sussex meets with the President of Angola Joao Lourenco and First Lady Ana Dias Lourenco at the presidential palace in Luanda, Angola on day six of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex meets Barnaby Jose Mar, 6, as he visits the Princess Diana Orthopaedic Centre in Huambo, Angola, on day five of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex meets landmine victim Sandra Tigica, who Princess Diana met on her visit to Angola 1997, during a reception at the British Ambassadors Residence in Luanda, Angola, on day five of the royal tour of Africa.
File photo dated 14/01/97 of Diana, Princess of Wales, with Sandra Tigica 13, at the orthopaedic workshop in Neves Mendinha, near Launda, Angola. The Duke of Sussex met Sandra Tigica again today, on day five of the royal tour of Africa.
File photo dated 30/06/97 of Prince Harry standing with Eufrafina, 3 and her mother Sandra Tigica. The Duke of Sussex met Sandra Tigica again on day five of the royal tour of Africa, recalling when Princess Diana met on her visit to Angola in 1997.
The Duke of Sussex meets patients as he visits the Princess Diana Orthopaedic Centre in Huambo, Angola, on day five of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex sits alone beneath the Diana Tree in Huambo, Angola, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. The Duke is visiting the minefield where his late mother, the Princess of Wales, was photographed in 1997, which is now a busy street with schools, shops and houses.
Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
Prince Harry retraces Diana's footsteps through Angola minefield
FILE - In this Jan. 15, 1997 file photo, Britain's Princess Diana uses a remote switch to trigger the detonation of some explosive ordinance dug up by mine sweepers in Huambo, Angola. Prince Harry on Friday Sept. 27, 2019, is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (AP Photo/Giovanni Diffidenti, File)
Britain's Prince Harry watches a controlled explosion in a partially cleared minefield in Dirico, Angola Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
FILE - In this Jan. 15, 1997 file photo, Princess Diana, wearing a bombproof visor, visits a minefield in Huambo, in Angola. Prince Harry on Friday Sept. 27, 2019, is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (John Stillwell/PA via AP, File)
Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola, Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola, Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
Prince Harry walks through Angola mine field, echoing Diana
Britain's Prince Harry with Jose Antonio, center, of the Halo Trust and a mine clearance worker walk through a minefield in Dirico, Angola Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
The Duke of Sussex during a tree planting event with local children, at the Chobe National Park, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex is greeted by Tlotlo Moilwa during a visit to the Kasane Health Post, run by the Sentebale charity, in Kasane, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex gives a television interview during a tree planting event with local school children, at the Chobe National Park, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex joins in a confidence building exercise with young people including Tlotlo Moilwa (left), during a visit to the Kasane Health Post, run by the Sentebale charity, in Kasane, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex (left) during a tree planting event with local school children, at the Chobe Tree Reserve, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex helps plant a baobab tree during a tree planting event with local children, at the Chobe National Park, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex joins in a tree planting event with local children, at the Chobe National Park, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex (centre) helps plant a baobab tree during a tree planting event with local children, at the Chobe National Park, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex (right) with founder of Elephants Without Borders Dr Mike Chase, are welcomed to a tree planting event by local children, at the Chobe Tree Reserve, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex with founder of Elephants Without Borders Dr Mike Chase, during a tree planting event with local schoolchildren, at the Chobe Tree Reserve, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex (second left) joins in a group exercise during a tree planting event with local children, at the Chobe Tree Reserve, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex joins a Botswana Defence Force anti-poaching patrol, on the Chobe river in Kasane, Botswana, on day four of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex joins a Botswana Defence Force anti-poaching patrol on the Chobe river in Kasane, Botswana, on day four of the royal tour of Africa.
A Botswana Defence Force anti-poaching patrol, on the Chobe river in Kasane, Botswana, on day four of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex joins a Botswana Defence Force anti-poaching patrol on the Chobe river in Kasane, Botswana, on day four of the royal tour of Africa.
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Visibly caught off-guard by the inquiry, the 35-year-old said, "What? Ask them," as he continued to move toward his car.

"Is that why it's important for you to come and talk to them?" Mills pushed.

Harry then used his arm to shoo her away and reprimanded her for the questions, "Rhiannon, don't behave like this."

The moment happened on Tuesday, October 1, just hours before the Duke of Sussex released a forceful statement defending his wife, Meghan Markle, from "relentless" attacks in the media and announcing that the couple would be "taking legal action" against the Daily Mail and its parent company after it published a private letter Meghan had written her father, Thomas Markle.

"As a couple, we believe in media freedom and objective, truthful reporting. We regard it as a cornerstone of democracy and in the current state of the world -- on every level -- we have never needed responsible media more," Harry said in a lengthy statement. "Unfortunately, my wife has become one of the latest victims of a British tabloid press that wages campaigns against individuals with no thought to the consequences – a ruthless campaign that has escalated over the past year, throughout her pregnancy and while raising our newborn son."

"Though we have continued to put on a brave face -- as so many of you can relate to -- I cannot begin to describe how painful it has been. Because in today's digital age, press fabrications are repurposed as truth across the globe. One day's coverage is no longer tomorrow's chip-paper," Harry continued. "Up to now, we have been unable to correct the continual misrepresentations - something that these select media outlets have been aware of and have therefore exploited on a daily and sometimes hourly basis."

The British royal went on to remind the public and the media alike that he's experienced first-hand the effects of the media going overboard when it comes to interest and intense coverage of one of his family members, alluding to his mother, Princess Diana, being killed in a 1997 car crash as she was being chased by paparazzi in Paris.

"Though this action may not be the safe one, it is the right one. Because my deepest fear is history repeating itself," he said. "I've seen what happens when someone I love is commoditised to the point that they are no longer treated or seen as a real person. I lost my mother and now I watch my wife falling victim to the same powerful forces."

One day after Harry's strongly-worded statement was released, he stepped out hand-in-hand with the Duchess of Sussex, putting up a united front amid heightened scrutiny.

SEE ALSO: Prince Harry releases forceful statement defending his wife, Meghan Markle

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