Duke greets landmine victim who met his mother to complete ‘beautiful story’

Diana, Princess of Wales cried as she watched a young Angolan girl being measured for a new prosthetic leg during her famous anti-landmine trip to the country.

Sandra Thijika, who was famously pictured sitting on Diana's knee, described the experience of meeting the royal as making her feel "complete".

And when she met the princess's son, the Duke of Sussex, she described the encounter as a continuation of a long and beautiful story.

Harry ended the second day of his visit to Angola by meeting Ms Thijika, 38, a landmine victim who was famously pictured with his mother sitting under a fig tree in an orthopaedic workshop in Luanda in 1997.

"It's incredibly emotional to follow in the footsteps of my mother... If 20 years ago she hadn't done what she did, this would still be a minefield. To see this as a thriving community is amazing." – The Duke of Sussex Above, some words from The Duke of Sussex as he spoke candidly today about his experience retracing his mother's visit to Angola in 1997. He was able to see firsthand more of the legacy she left on the world. Princess Diana brought global attention to the issue of landmines and helped change the future for this community in Huambo, and many more like it. This afternoon, 22 years later, The Duke was able to walk the same path, but now rather than walking amongst mines, he was able to walk among a bustling community with schools, colleges and small businesses. Earlier today The Duke joined @thehalotrust to once again highlight the issue of landmines that still threatens more than 60 million people worldwide. #RoyalVisitAngola Video © SussexRoyal

A post shared by The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (@sussexroyal) on

The princess had not only walked through a partially cleared minefield in Angola to raise awareness about the issue of the weapons, but spent time with people maimed by the munitions laid during a bloody civil war

Ms Thijika said after chatting to Harry: "I think I met Princess Diana on a Tuesday, she came to the centre and she wanted to see how a change of prosthetic limb was done.

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Royal visit to Africa
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Royal visit to Africa
The Duke of Sussex makes a speech at a reception at the British High Commissioner�s Residence in Lilongwe, Malawi.
The Duke of Sussex speaks to Angeline Murimirwa, the Executive Director of Africa CAMFED, during his visit to the Nalikule College of Education in Malawi on day seven of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duchess of Sussex appears on a television screen as she speaks via skype during the Duke of Sussex's visit to the Nalikule College of Education in Lilongwe, Malawi, to see the work of the CAMA network supporting young women in Malawi.
The Duke of Sussex arrives at the Nalikule College of Education to learn about the CAMA network and how it is supporting young women in Malawi on day seven of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex sings with the CAMA choir during a visit to the Nalikule College of Education in Lilongwe, Malawi, to see the work of the CAMA network supporting young women in Malawi.
The Duke of Sussex sings with the CAMA choir during a visit to the Nalikule College of Education in Lilongwe, Malawi, to see the work of the CAMA network supporting young women in Malawi.
The Duke of Sussex walks on Princess Diana Street in Huambo, Angola, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. The Duke is visiting the minefield where his late mother, the Princess of Wales, was photographed in 1997, which is now a busy street with schools, shops and houses.
Photo by: KGC-178/STAR MAX/IPx 2019 9/28/19 Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex, ties a ribbon at the memorial to student Uyinene Mrwetyana at the post office where she was raped and murdered last month. A post on the official Instagram account of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex said "The Duke and Duchess had been following what had happened from afar and were both eager to learn more when they arrived in South Africa." These images were posted on @SussexRoyal today and supplied by the Royal Household.
Photo by: KGC-178/STAR MAX/IPx 2019 9/28/19 Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex, ties a ribbon at the memorial to student Uyinene Mrwetyana at the post office where she was raped and murdered last month. A post on the official Instagram account of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex said "The Duke and Duchess had been following what had happened from afar and were both eager to learn more when they arrived in South Africa." These images were posted on @SussexRoyal today and supplied by the Royal Household.
The Duke of Sussex arrives for an audience with President Jo�o Louren�o at the presidential palace in Luanda, Angola on day six of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex in front of the Diana Tree in Huambo, Angola, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. The Duke is visiting the minefield where his late mother, the Princess of Wales, was photographed in 1997, which is now a busy street with schools, shops and houses.
The Duke of Sussex meets with the President of Angola Joao Lourenco and First Lady Ana Dias Lourenco at the presidential palace in Luanda, Angola on day six of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex meets Barnaby Jose Mar, 6, as he visits the Princess Diana Orthopaedic Centre in Huambo, Angola, on day five of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex meets landmine victim Sandra Tigica, who Princess Diana met on her visit to Angola 1997, during a reception at the British Ambassadors Residence in Luanda, Angola, on day five of the royal tour of Africa.
File photo dated 14/01/97 of Diana, Princess of Wales, with Sandra Tigica 13, at the orthopaedic workshop in Neves Mendinha, near Launda, Angola. The Duke of Sussex met Sandra Tigica again today, on day five of the royal tour of Africa.
File photo dated 30/06/97 of Prince Harry standing with Eufrafina, 3 and her mother Sandra Tigica. The Duke of Sussex met Sandra Tigica again on day five of the royal tour of Africa, recalling when Princess Diana met on her visit to Angola in 1997.
The Duke of Sussex meets patients as he visits the Princess Diana Orthopaedic Centre in Huambo, Angola, on day five of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex sits alone beneath the Diana Tree in Huambo, Angola, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. The Duke is visiting the minefield where his late mother, the Princess of Wales, was photographed in 1997, which is now a busy street with schools, shops and houses.
Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
Prince Harry retraces Diana's footsteps through Angola minefield
FILE - In this Jan. 15, 1997 file photo, Britain's Princess Diana uses a remote switch to trigger the detonation of some explosive ordinance dug up by mine sweepers in Huambo, Angola. Prince Harry on Friday Sept. 27, 2019, is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (AP Photo/Giovanni Diffidenti, File)
Britain's Prince Harry watches a controlled explosion in a partially cleared minefield in Dirico, Angola Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
FILE - In this Jan. 15, 1997 file photo, Princess Diana, wearing a bombproof visor, visits a minefield in Huambo, in Angola. Prince Harry on Friday Sept. 27, 2019, is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (John Stillwell/PA via AP, File)
Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola, Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola, Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
Britain's Prince Harry walks through a minefield in Dirico, Angola Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
Prince Harry walks through Angola mine field, echoing Diana
Britain's Prince Harry with Jose Antonio, center, of the Halo Trust and a mine clearance worker walk through a minefield in Dirico, Angola Friday Sept. 27, 2019, during a visit to see the work of landmine clearance charity the Halo Trust, on day five of the royal tour of Africa. Prince Harry is following in the footsteps of his late mother, Princess Diana, whose walk through an active mine field in Angola years ago helped to lead to a global ban on the deadly weapons. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
The Duke of Sussex during a tree planting event with local children, at the Chobe National Park, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex is greeted by Tlotlo Moilwa during a visit to the Kasane Health Post, run by the Sentebale charity, in Kasane, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex gives a television interview during a tree planting event with local school children, at the Chobe National Park, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex joins in a confidence building exercise with young people including Tlotlo Moilwa (left), during a visit to the Kasane Health Post, run by the Sentebale charity, in Kasane, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex (left) during a tree planting event with local school children, at the Chobe Tree Reserve, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex helps plant a baobab tree during a tree planting event with local children, at the Chobe National Park, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex joins in a tree planting event with local children, at the Chobe National Park, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex (centre) helps plant a baobab tree during a tree planting event with local children, at the Chobe National Park, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex (right) with founder of Elephants Without Borders Dr Mike Chase, are welcomed to a tree planting event by local children, at the Chobe Tree Reserve, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex with founder of Elephants Without Borders Dr Mike Chase, during a tree planting event with local schoolchildren, at the Chobe Tree Reserve, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex (second left) joins in a group exercise during a tree planting event with local children, at the Chobe Tree Reserve, Botswana.
The Duke of Sussex joins a Botswana Defence Force anti-poaching patrol, on the Chobe river in Kasane, Botswana, on day four of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex joins a Botswana Defence Force anti-poaching patrol on the Chobe river in Kasane, Botswana, on day four of the royal tour of Africa.
A Botswana Defence Force anti-poaching patrol, on the Chobe river in Kasane, Botswana, on day four of the royal tour of Africa.
The Duke of Sussex joins a Botswana Defence Force anti-poaching patrol on the Chobe river in Kasane, Botswana, on day four of the royal tour of Africa.
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"At that time I was very small, I was a very tiny girl and they started measuring my knee so they could see how the prosthetic would fit.

"Princess Diana was watching this process and she started crying as she watched me getting measured for a new prosthetic.

"After they measured my knee we went outside and we sat by a fig tree and she was speaking to me and I felt very happy, I felt very complete to have the attention of a princess.

"It was an honour to be sitting next to a princess."

Ms Thijika was a special guest at a reception hosted by Jessica Hand, Britain's Ambassador to Angola, at her official residence in Luanda.

Speaking about Angola's £48 million pledge to invest in the work of the landmine clearing charity Halo Trust in the country, the duke told Ms Thijika: "I know you will never get your leg back, but I hope with the president's contribution...you will have some peace of mind."

Diana memorial concert build-up
Prince Harry stands with Eufrafina, three, her mother Sandra Thijika on a previous visit in 2007 (Andrew Parsons/PA)

The mother told the duke she had five children, and the royal seemed taken aback and asked for their ages and she told him, speaking through an interpreter: "I have a daughter I named her after Diana."

Harry sounded a positive note, telling her: "Your children will be growing up to your age and there won't be any landmines."

In response to Harry's pledge, the 38-year-old said: "I'm very happy to hear him say that, it feels like the work in Angola will continue and we will be landmine free."

She said about meeting Harry: "This is a long story and this is a beautiful story because I've come out of the province to meet Diana's son, so this is putting the focus on all of us who have physical disabilities.

"So it's good for Angola that the world can see we need help that we need help and much can be done for us."

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