Judy Murray nets honorary doctorate at university degree ceremony

Tennis coach Judy Murray is among three honorary graduates being awarded doctorates from The Open University in Glasgow on Friday.

The former Fed Cup captain, who helped coach her sons Andy and Jamie – who went on to achieve world number one status in singles and doubles respectively – praised the university for widening access to education.

Crime writer Professor Louise Welsh and campaigner Dr Corinne Hutton, a quadruple amputee who was given a double hand transplant earlier this year, are also being awarded honorary doctorates.

Louise Welsh
Author Louise Welsh was previously awarded an honorary doctorate from Edinburgh Napier University (Andrew Milligan/PA)

The three will join about 530 Open University graduates at ceremonies in Glasgow on Friday to receive their awards.

Ms Murray, honoured for public services, said: “I have worked for most of my coaching career to make tennis more inclusive and more accessible to anyone who has an interest in playing.

“I’m delighted to receive this award from The Open University because for fifty years it has done something similar with higher education, opening up university study to everyone, regardless of who or where they are.

“My experience in tennis also means I know the value of dedicated effort in pursuit of your goals.

“It’s something I can see in students and graduates of the OU, and that’s why it’s a pleasure to have the chance to celebrate with them on their special day.”

Professor Welsh, who was recognised for her contribution to education and culture, said the award is a “great honour”.

She added: “Two words, Open and University, sitting side by side sends a hugely powerful message.”

Dr Hutton, honoured for public services, said she was “flattered and humbled” and credited her team at the Finding Your Feet charity she set up to help amputees.

Corinne Hutton
Corinne Hutton following her hand transplant (Finding Your Feet/PA)

Susan Stewart, director of The Open University in Scotland, said: “There’s no such thing as a typical OU student, but what they all have in common is that they have hugely busy lives.

“They fit their study in along with family, work and all sorts of other responsibilities, which makes today’s celebrations particularly special.

“These wonderful graduates join the 200,000 Scots who’ve studied with the OU in the 50 years since our founding and it’s a pleasure to be able to welcome them, and our inspiring honorary graduates, to the OU family.”

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