Dominic Cummings: It’s not surprising voters are angry at MPs over Brexit

Dominic Cummings has said it is "not surprising" that some voters are angry after Boris Johnson was criticised for stoking fury over Brexit.

The Prime Minister's senior adviser added that the only way the issue of threats and abuse will be solved is if MPs "respect" the result of the EU referendum.

His comments, at a book launch on Thursday, came as the PM refused to bow to mounting pressure to apologise over his use of language.

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Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Senior political aide Dominic Cummings speaks to Stuart Wheeler, at his book launch for Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics, at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Stuart Wheeler (left) with Dominic Cummings at the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
Pro remain campaigner Steve Bray interviews Dominic Cummings as he arrives at the Cabinet office in London,United Kingdom on 22nd August 2019. (photo by Claire Doherty/In Pictures via Getty Images)
Dominic Cummings arrives in Downing Street, London.
Senior aide to the prime minister Dominic Cummings leaves following a cabinet meeting at 10 Downing Street, London.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson with his senior aid Dominic Cummings as they leave Downing Street, central London.
Senior aide to the prime minister Dominic Cummings, in Downing Street in Westminster, London.
Dominic Cummings, special advisor for Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, leaves his home in London, Britain, September 2, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
Dominic Cummings, special advisor for Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, leaves his home in London, Britain, September 2, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
Dominic Cummings, special advisor for Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, leaves his home in London, Britain, August 20, 2019. REUTERS/Hannah McKay
LONDON, ENGLAND - AUGUST 7: Dominic Cummings, special advisor to Prime Minister Boris Johnson arrives at 10 Downing Street on August 7, 2019 in London, England. (Photo by Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images)
Number 10 Chief of Staff Dominic Cummings arrives at Downing Street in central London on August 2, 2019. (Photo by Tolga AKMEN / AFP) (Photo credit should read TOLGA AKMEN/AFP/Getty Images)
Dominic Cummings, a senior aide to Prime Minister Boris Johnson, attends the book launch of Winning Against the Odds: My Life in Gambling and Politics by Stuart Wheeler at Carlton House Terrace, London.
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Amid furious scenes in the Commons, Mr Johnson repeatedly described attempts to block no-deal as the "surrender act" and dismissed a Labour MP's complaint that his "inflammatory" language risked provoking attacks as "humbug".

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn warned that the PM's language was encouraging people to behave in a "disgraceful and abusive way".

When Mr Cummings was asked if he blamed MPs for the abuse, he replied: "The MPs said we will have a referendum, we will respect the result and then they spent three years swerving all over the shop.

"It is not surprising some people are angry about it. I find it very odd that these characters are complaining that people are unhappy about their behaviour now and they also say they want a referendum."

He added: "If you are a bunch of politicians and say that we swear we are going to respect the result of a democratic vote, and then after you lose you say, we don't want to respect that vote, what do you expect to happen?"

Mr Cummings was also asked if MPs have themselves to blame for the abuse.

"That's the way you're putting it. I am using my language," he replied, while at a London event marking the launch of a new book by Vote Leave supporter and businessman Stuart Wheeler.

He said that both Leave and Remain campaigners have had "serious threats" of violence, which he said should be taken seriously.

"In the end the situation can only be resolved by Parliament honouring its promise to respect the result," he added.

Mr Johnson had further angered the opposition by suggesting that the best way to honour murdered Remain-supporting MP Jo Cox was to "get Brexit done".

On Thursday, Liberal Democrat leader Jo Swinson had to leave cross-party talks early so she could speak to police about a threat made to one of her children.

And Labour MP Jess Phillips disclosed that a man had been arrested while trying to smash the windows and kick the door of her Birmingham Yardley constituency office while yelling "fascist".

Also at the book launch, Mr Cummings painted a picture of calm at Downing Street, despite the PM's multiple Commons defeats and the Supreme Court ruling that his prorogation was unlawful.

The Vote Leave campaign director said: "We are not under pressure, the referendum was pressure. The referendum was difficult.

"This is a walk in the park compared to the referendum, we are enjoying this, we are going to leave and we are going to win."

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