Speaker John Bercow confirms Commons will sit on Wednesday

Boris Johnson could face demands to appear before MPs on Wednesday after Commons Speaker John Bercow announced that the House would resume its business.

There will be no session of Prime Minister's Questions, but Mr Bercow said there would be scope for applications for emergency debates and calls for ministers to be summoned to the House.

The Prime Minister is in New York for the UN General Assembly but is expected to come under pressure from opponents to return early.

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Prorogation of Parliament ruled unlawful by Supreme Court
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Prorogation of Parliament ruled unlawful by Supreme Court
Gina Miller leaves Millbank in Westminster, after judges at the Supreme Court ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
Gina Miller leaves Millbank in Westminster, after judges at the Supreme Court ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
Alan Duncan MP, former Foreign Office speaking to media after a ruling that the prorogation of Parliament was unlawful in London,UK on September 24, 2019. The Supreme Court ruled that Prime Minster Boris Johnson acted unlawfully when he requested that the Queen prorogue parliament for more than a month, and that parliamentarians should reconvene "as soon as possible." (Photo by Claire Doherty/Sipa USA)
Joanna Cherry, SNP MP and QC, who led the cross-party legal action in Scotland against the Prime Minister speaks to media after a ruling that the prorogation of Parliament was unlawful in London,UK on September 24, 2019. The Supreme Court ruled that Prime Minster Boris Johnson acted unlawfully when he requested that the Queen prorogue parliament for more than a month, and that parliamentarians should reconvene "as soon as possible." (Photo by Claire Doherty/Sipa USA)
First Minister Nicola Sturgeon delivers her statement, in response to the Supreme Court ruling, at the Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson (left) meets US President Donald Trump at the 74th Session of the UN General Assembly, at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, USA. PA Photo. Picture date: Tuesday September 24, 2019. Mr Johnson will return to the UK Wednesday following the decision at the Supreme Court ruled that his advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful. See PA story POLITICS UN. Photo credit should read: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire
Prime Minister Boris Johnson addressing US business leaders at Hudson Yards in New York after judges at the Supreme Court in London ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
Former Work and Pensions Secretary Amber Rudd leaves Millbank in Westminster, after judges at the Supreme Court ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson in New York after judges at the Supreme Court in London ruled that his advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
Businesswoman and campaigner Gina Miller, (C) who launched legal proceedings against Prime Minister Boris Johnson's government over the suspension of parliament leaving the Supreme Court after a ruling that the prorogation of Parliament was unlawful in London,UK on September 24, 2019. The Supreme Court ruled that Prime Minster Boris Johnson acted unlawfully when he requested that the Queen prorogue parliament for more than a month, and that parliamentarians should reconvene "as soon as possible." (Photo by Claire Doherty/Sipa USA)
Sinn Fein Vice President Michelle O'Neill (centre) with party colleagues Caral Ni Chuilin (left) and Chris Hazzard (right) outside the party's headquarters in Belfast, as they react to the Supreme Court ruling that suspending Parliament was unlawful.
Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow on College Green in Westminster, announcing that the House of Commons will resume business from Wednesday, after judges at the Supreme Court ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
A protester holds a giant P45 with Prime Minister Boris Johnson's name on it outside the Houses of Parliament in Westminster, after judges at the Supreme Court ruled that his advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow on College Green in Westminster, announcing that the House of Commons will resume business from Wednesday, after judges at the Supreme Court ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
Labour delegates react as the Supreme Court rules Boris Johnson acted unlawfully when he asked the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks, on the fourth day of the Labour Party annual conference at the Brighton Centre in Brighton. Picture dated: Tuesday September 24, 2019. Photo credit should read: Isabel Infantes / EMPICS Entertainment.
Jeremy Corbyn reacts as the Supreme Court rules Boris Johnson acted unlawfully when he asked the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks, on the fourth day of the Labour Party annual conference at the Brighton Centre in Brighton. Picture dated: Tuesday September 24, 2019. Photo credit should read: Isabel Infantes / EMPICS Entertainment.
Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow on College Green in Westminster, announcing that the House of Commons will resume business from Wednesday, after judges at the Supreme Court ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
Labour delegates react as the Supreme Court rules Boris Johnson acted unlawfully when he asked the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks, on the fourth day of the Labour Party annual conference at the Brighton Centre in Brighton. Picture dated: Tuesday September 24, 2019. Photo credit should read: Isabel Infantes / EMPICS Entertainment.
(left to right) John McDonnell and Rebecca Long-Bailey react during Jeremy Corbyn's speech to the news of the Supreme Court ruling Boris Johnson acted unlawfully when he asked the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks, on the fourth day of the Labour Party annual conference at the Brighton Centre in Brighton. Picture dated: Tuesday September 24, 2019. Photo credit should read: Isabel Infantes / EMPICS Entertainment.
A man wearing a giant Boris Johnson mask, dressed as a prisoner, outside the Supreme Court in London, where judges have ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford MP leaving the Supreme Court in London, where judges have ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
(Left to right) Leader of The Independent Group for Change Anna Soubry, Plaid Cymru Westminster Leader Liz Saville-Roberts, SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford MP, and Green MP Caroline Lucas, outside the Supreme Court in London, where judges have ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
Gina Miller speaks to the media outside the Supreme Court in London, where judges have ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
(Left to right) Leader of The Independent Group for Change Anna Soubry, Plaid Cymru Westminster Leader Liz Saville-Roberts, SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford MP, and Green MP Caroline Lucas, outside the Supreme Court in London, where judges have ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
Anna Soubry reacts outside the Supreme Court in London, where judges have ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
SNP MP Joanna Cherry and lawyer Jolyon Maugham speaking to the media outside the Supreme Court in London, where judges have ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
A man reacts as he leaves the Supreme Court in London, where judges have ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
Protesters celebrating outside the Supreme Court in London, where judges have ruled that Prime Minister Boris Johnson's advice to the Queen to suspend Parliament for five weeks was unlawful.
Protesters outside the Supreme Court in London, where judges are ruling on the legality of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's decision to suspend Parliament for five weeks.
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The Commons Speaker said: "The citizens of the UK are entitled to expect that Parliament does discharge its core functions, that it is in a position to scrutinise the executive, to hold ministers to account and to legislate if it chooses.

"In the light of that explicit judgment, I have instructed the House authorities to prepare not for the recall – the prorogation was unlawful and is void – to prepare for the resumption of the business of the House of Commons.

Brexit"Specifically I have instructed the House authorities to undertake such steps as are necessary to ensure that the House of Commons sits tomorrow, that it does so at 11.30."

He said he had contacted party leaders or their representatives to inform them.

"Owing to notification requirements, which I'm sure you are all closely familiar with, it will not be possible for there to be a Prime Minister's Questions.

"However, for the avoidance of doubt there will be full scope of urgent questions, for ministerial statements, and for applications for emergency debates under Standing Order number 24."

Labour MP Wes Streeting told the PA news agency the PM should return to Parliament on Wednesday, adding: "Boris Johnson needs to explain himself to the Queen, to Parliament and the country.

"He's lied to her, lied to us and lied to them. He must do the decent thing and resign."

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