US military apologises for joking about bombing ‘millennials’ who attempt to storm Area 51

People dressed in costumes chant as they approach a gate to Area 51 as an influx of tourists responding to a call to 'storm' Area 51, a secretive U.S. military base believed by UFO enthusiasts to hold government secrets about extra-terrestrials, is expected in Rachel, Nevada, U.S. September 20, 2019. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart

The US military has been forced to apologise for tweeting that it would use stealth-bombers on "millenials" who try to storm Area 51.

More than two million people signed up to a Facebook event recently which encouraged atendees to visit the top secret base in Nevada.

But only a few thousand UFO enthusiasts turned up on Friday to the facility, which is rumoured to contain secrets about aliens.

As hordes of enthusiasts turned up the PR arm of the US military, called the Defence Visual Information Distribution Service (DVIDS), tweeted: "The last thing #Millennials will see if they attempt the #area51raid today" with a picture of military officers in front of a stealth bomber.

Shortly afterwards the tweet was deleted and the unit apologised saying it "in no way" reflects their stance.

"Last night a DVIDSHUB employee posted a tweet that in NO WAY supports the stance of the Department of Defense," the unit later said, "It was inappropriate and we apologise for this mistake."

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Storm Area 51
From left, sisters Kathy Richey, Gerry Garcia and Sandy Haney wait in line for the gift shop at the Storm Area 51 Basecamp event Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, in Hiko, Nev. The event was inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
People dressed in costumes chant as they approach a gate to Area 51 as an influx of tourists responding to a call to 'storm' Area 51, a secretive U.S. military base believed by UFO enthusiasts to hold government secrets about extra-terrestrials, is expected in Rachel, Nevada, U.S. September 20, 2019. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart
People gather near a gate to Area 51 as an influx of tourists responding to a call to 'storm' Area 51, a secretive U.S. military base believed by UFO enthusiasts to hold government secrets about extra-terrestrials, is expected in Rachel, Nevada, U.S. September 20, 2019. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart
A person carries a sign outside a gate to Area 51 as an influx of tourists responding to a call to 'storm' Area 51, a secretive U.S. military base believed by UFO enthusiasts to hold government secrets about extra-terrestrials, is expected in Rachel, Nevada, U.S. September 20, 2019. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart
Audrie Clark smokes a vape outside of the Storm Area 51 Basecamp event Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, in Hiko, Nev. The event was inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Martin Custodio wears a Pepe mask while standing near razor wire at an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, near Rachel, Nev. People came to visit the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
HIKO, NEVADA - SEPTEMBER 20: A general view of the atmosphere at 'Storm' Area 51 Basecamp at Alien Research Center on September 20, 2019 in Hiko, Nevada. (Photo by Jerod Harris/Getty Images)
Mario Rayna, center, chants with others at an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51 Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, near Rachel, Nev. People gathered at the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
De izquierda a derecha: Alex Clark, Carolyn Milner, Audrie Clark y Lucinda Clark bailan a un lado de su auto en el evento Storm Area 51 Basecamp el viernes 20 de septiembre de 2019 en Hiko, Nevada. (AP Foto/John Locher)
Seth Unterseher holds an umbrella for shade while wearing an alien mask at an event at the Little A'Le'Inn inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax Saturday, Sept. 21, 2019, in Rachel, Nev. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Alex Clark smokes a cigarette outside of the Storm Area 51 Basecamp event Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, in Hiko, Nev. The event was inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. Thousands of curious Earthlings from around the globe traveled to festivals, and several hundred made forays toward the secret Area 51 military base in the Nevada desert on Friday, drawn by an internet buzz and a social media craze sparked by a summertime Facebook post inviting people to “Storm Area 51.” (AP Photo/John Locher)
A man in costume walks around an event at the Little A'Le'Inn inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax Saturday, Sept. 21, 2019, in Rachel, Nev. The promoter of the event in the remote Nevada desert has pulled the plug due to low attendance, while the host of a festival for several thousand people in the tiny town of Rachel said Saturday her show will go on. (AP Photo/John Locher)
HIKO, NEVADA - SEPTEMBER 20: A general view of the atmosphere at 'Storm' Area 51 Basecamp at Alien Research Center on September 20, 2019 in Hiko, Nevada. (Photo by Jerod Harris/Getty Images)
Vito Chimienti, left, talks with Parker Collard at an event at the Little A'Le'Inn inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax Saturday, Sept. 21, 2019, in Rachel, Nev. The promoter of the event in the remote Nevada desert has pulled the plug due to low attendance, while the host of a festival for several thousand people in the tiny town of Rachel said Saturday her show will go on. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Michaela Ripley eats breakfast beside her inflatable alien the Little A'Le'Inn during an event inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax Saturday, Sept. 21, 2019, in Rachel, Nev. The promoter of the event in the remote Nevada desert has pulled the plug due to low attendance, while the host of a festival for several thousand people in the tiny town of Rachel said Saturday her show will go on. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Martin Custodio, left, and Rafael Castillo wear Pepe masks while standing near razor wire at an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, near Rachel, Nev. People came to visit the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
People dressed in costumes visit an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, near Rachel, Nev. People came to visit the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
A man in a tinfoil hat sits near an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, near Rachel, Nev. People came to visit the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Ryan Grizzell sits on a barricade, while wearing a tinfoil hat, near an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, near Rachel, Nev. People came to visit the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Joel Kelsey, left, and Chase Hansen hold inflatable aliens near an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, near Rachel, Nev. People came to visit the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Marshall Bishop blows up an inflatable alien at the Storm Area 51 Basecamp event Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, in Hiko, Nev. "It's the perfect stat to have this in. They turn everything into a party," Bishop said about the event, which was inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Lizbeth Donnelly, left, kisses Jason Donnelly as they dance at the Storm Area 51 Basecamp event Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, in Hiko, Nev. The event was inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. Thousands of curious Earthlings from around the globe traveled to festivals, and several hundred made forays toward the secret Area 51 military base in the Nevada desert on Friday, drawn by an internet buzz and a social media craze sparked by a summertime Facebook post inviting people to “Storm Area 51.” (AP Photo/John Locher)
People line up outside of the gift shop at the Storm Area 51 Basecamp event Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, in Hiko, Nev. The event was inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. Thousands of curious Earthlings from around the globe traveled to festivals, and several hundred made forays toward the secret Area 51 military base in the Nevada desert on Friday, drawn by an internet buzz and a social media craze sparked by a summertime Facebook post inviting people to “Storm Area 51.” (AP Photo/John Locher)
Jackson Carter and Veronica Savage wait for passes to enter the Storm Area 51 Basecamp event Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, in Hiko, Nev. The event was inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
A man stands at an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51 Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, near Rachel, Nev. People gathered at the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Police officers guard an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51 Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, near Rachel, Nev. People gathered at the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
People holds signs at an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51 Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, near Rachel, Nev. People gathered at the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
A man in an alien mask stands at an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51 Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, outside of Rachel, Nev. People gathered at the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Martin Custodio pretends to "Naruto run" at an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51 Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, near Rachel, Nev. People came to visit the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Sheriff's deputies escort a woman who ducked under the gate at an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51 Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, near Rachel, Nev. People gathered at the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
A crowd chants while holding sings at the at an entrance to the Nevada Test and Training Range near Area 51 Friday, Sept. 20, 2019, near Rachel, Nev. People gathered at the gate inspired by the "Storm Area 51" internet hoax. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Military personnel with dogs guard a gate to Area 51 as an influx of tourists responding to a call to 'storm' Area 51, a secretive U.S. military base believed by UFO enthusiasts to hold government secrets about extra-terrestrials, is expected in Rachel, Nevada, U.S. September 21, 2019. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart
People walk near a gate to Area 51 as an influx of tourists responding to a call to 'storm' Area 51, a secretive U.S. military base believed by UFO enthusiasts to hold government secrets about extra-terrestrials, is expected in Rachel, Nevada, U.S. September 20, 2019. REUTERS/Jim Urquhart
RACHEL, NEVADA - SEPTEMBER 21: Alien dolls are displayed at the Little A'Le'Inn during the 'Storm Area 51' spinoff event 'Alienstock' on September 21, 2019 in Rachel, Nevada. The event is a spinoff from the original 'Storm Area 51' Facebook event which jokingly encouraged participants to charge the famously secretive Area 51 military base in order to 'see them aliens'. Two tiny desert towns not far from from the once-secret Area 51 are hosting related events this weekend. The military has warned attendees not to approach the protected Area 51 military installation. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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Around 1,000 people visited the facility's gates on Friday and at least six were arrested by police.

The Storm Area 51 invitation spawned festivals in the tiny nearby towns of Rachel and Hiko, more than two hours' drive from Las Vegas.

Lincoln County Sheriff Kerry Lee estimated late on Thursday that about 1,500 people had gathered at the festival sites, and more than 150 made the trip several additional miles on bone-rattling dirt roads to get within selfie distance of the gates.

Millions of people responded to a June internet post calling for people to run into the remote US Air Force test site which has long been the focus of UFO conspiracy theories.

"They can't stop all of us," the post joked. "Lets see them aliens."

The military responded with stern warnings that lethal force could be used if people entered the Nevada Test and Training Range, and local and state officials said arrests would be made if people tried.

"It's public land," the sheriff said. "They're allowed to go to the gate as long as they don't cross the boundary."

Officials reported six arrests overall, mostly for misdemeanour trespassing on base property, a $1,000 (£800) fine.

- This article first appeared on Yahoo

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