‘Fatal Attraction’ killer Carolyn Warmus out of prison after 27 years behind bars

Infamous "Fatal Attraction" killer Carolyn Warmus was released from prison Monday after serving 27 years for murdering her lover's wife.

Inmate No. 92G0987, jailed at the Bedford Hill Correctional Facility, was granted parole last month by state officials.

She's going to be living in New York, she told officials.

Warmus, 55, was denied parole in her first shot at freedom two years ago for the Jan. 15, 1989, murder of Betty Jean Solomon — shot nine times inside her Greenburgh home. The sensational trial that followed was rife with tales of torrid sex and obsessive behavior, prompting the connection with the Michael Douglas-Glenn Close movie "Fatal Attraction."

Warmus was compared with Close's crazed bunny-boiling character, who shared an illicit, steamy romance with the married man played by Douglas.

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Carolyn Warmus 'Fatal Attraction' murder trial
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Carolyn Warmus 'Fatal Attraction' murder trial
Paul Solomon talks with an unidentified friend as he leaves Westchester Country Courthouse in White Plains, on May 27, 1992, after the jury found his former lover Carolyn Warmus, guilty of killing his wife, Betty Jeanne Solomon, in January of 1989. Warmus was found guilty of both second-degree murder and felony weapon possession. Warmus' first trial ended in a hung jury. (AP Photo/Andrew Savulich)
An unidentified bodyguard, left, attempts to shield former school teacher Carolyn Warmus as she exits from the Westchester County Courthouse in White Plains, N.Y., May 24, 1992. The jury ended the fourth day of deliberation in the trial against Warmus, who is accused of firing nine shots into betty Jeanne Solomon on Jan. 15, 1989. (AP Photo/Andrew Savulich)
Carolyn Warmus arrives at the Westchester County Courthouse in White Plains, N.Y., hooded against photographers, April 18, 1991, as the jury in her murder trial begins its second day of deliberations. Warmus is charged with firing nine shots at her lover's wife in 1989 in the case dubbed the "Fatal Attraction" trial. (AP Photo/Mario Suriani)
William Aronwald, attorney for the love triangle murder defendant Carolyn Warmus, speaks to the press during a lunch recess outside the White Plains courthouse, May 21, 1992. Jury deliberations began Thursday after one juror was dismissed after falling asleep during Westchester County Judge John Carey's instructions to the jury on the law. "We made an application to have her excused because she was sleeping. (AP Photo/Andrew Savulich)
Paul Solomon headshot, as witness in Carolyn Warmus "Fatal Attraction" trial for the murder of Solomon's wife, AP photo
Former school teacher Carolyn Warmus arrives at the Westchester County Courthouse in White Plains, N.Y., May 16, 1992. The jury began its sixth day of deliberation in the trial against Warmus who is accused of firing nine shots into Betty Jeanne Solomon on Jan. 15, 1989, because of her obsessive love for the victim's husband Paul. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Former school teacher Carolyn Warmus, dressed in black, walks through a metal detector at Westchester County Court in White Plains, Jan. 2, 1992. Warmus, accused of killing her lover's wife, and whose first trial was deadlocked, came to court as jury selection begins for retrial. (AP Photo/Andrew Savulich)
Tammy Rogers testifies in White Plains, N.Y., March 7, 1991, that Carolyn Warmus called her twice pretending to be someone else to ask about the whereabouts of Paul Solomon, Warmus' former lover. (AP Photo/Pool)
David Lewis, attorney for accused murderer Carolyn Warmus, gestures as he talks with reporters in the lobby of the Westchester County Courthouse in White Plains, N.Y., May 29, 1991. Lewis is seeking dismissal of the second-degree murder and criminal weapons possession charges against his client for insufficient evidence and that there are other possible suspects. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
Juror Bob Smith speaks to the press after the murder trial of Carolyn Warmus ended in White Plains, N.Y., with a hung jury after 11 days of deliberations, April 27, 1991. Smith, 27, who voted in favor of a conviction, said the four holdouts were three women and one man. (AP Photo/Mario Suriani)
Justice John Carey listens to testimony of Paul Solomon, husband of Betty Jeanne Solomon, murder victim, being read back to the jury during its deliberations in the Carolyn Warmus trial in White Plains, N.Y., April 25, 1991. The judge sent the jury home early, immediately after the read-back. (AP Photo/Mario Suriani)
Carolyn Warmus, the defendant in the "Fatal Attraction" murder case shields herself from photographers with her umbrella inside a car immediately after leaving Westchester County Court in White Plains, N.Y., April 24, 1991. The jury is still out deliberating her guilt or innocence. (AP Photo/Andrew Savulich)
Carolyn Warmus sits in a car after leaving the Westchester County Courthouse, April 22, 1991 at the end of the sixth full day of jury deliberations in her murder trial. Warmus is accused of killing Betty Jeanne Solomon, her lover's wife. (AP Photo/Mario Suriani)
Paul Solomon, right, enters the Westchester County Courthouse on April 21, 1991, with Joyce Green for the fifth day of jury deliberation in the Carolyn Warmus murder trial. Green is the sister of murder victim Betty Jeanne Solomon, Paul Solomon's wife. (AP Photo/Mike Albans)
Carolyn Warms, foreground, takes notes during her trial in White Plains, N.Y., in this courtroom drawing by Marilyn Church, April 20, 1991. In what headline writers have been describing as the "Fatal Attraction" trial, the jury continued deliberating on Warmus' alleged involvement in the 1989 murder of Betty Jeanne Solomon, her lover's wife. (AP Photo/Marilyn Church)
Carolyn Warmus in white coat, leaves the Westchester County courthouse with her face shielded by her bodyguard, Victor Ruggiero in White Plains, N.Y., April 20, 1991. Warmus had broken down in tears during a meeting with the judge in her murder case after she claimed she had it with the media. (AP Photo/Mario Suriani)
Carolyn Warmus, wearing a scarf to hide her face, arrives at Westchester County Court in White Plains where her murder trial is in it's fourth day of deliberations, AP photo
Carolyn Warmus hides behind a folder held up by an unidentified man as they leave the Westchester County courthouse, April 20, 1991. Warmus is on trial in the "Fatal Attraction" murder case. (AP Photo/Andrew Savulich)
David Lewis, left, defense attorney for Carolyn Warmus, and James McCarty, assistant district attorney for Westchester County, confer in court in White Plains, N.Y., April 18, 1991. The jury is in deliberations over the fate of Carolyn Warmus, charged in the January 1989 murder of Betty Jeanne Solomon. (AP Photo/Pool/Mark Lennihan)
Judge John Carey holds up pages of testimony while listening to a playback of taped testimony during the Carolyn Warmus murder trial in White Plains, N.Y., April 17, 1991. Warmus is accused in the January 1989 murder of Betty Jeanne Solomon. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
Michael Yeager, a financial systems analyst for MCI, testifies during the Carolyn Warmus trial in New York, April 1, 1991. two phone company records, that are key to the prosecution of Carolyn Warmus, are inexplicably inconsistent, testimony showed Monday. (AP Photo/New York Daily News Pool/Dan Cronin)
Joseph Lisella of East Hartland, Conn. identifies a photograph of Paul Solomon as one of the men he overheard talking about throwing a gun in a river and exchange $20,000, during the Carolyn Warmus "Fatal Attraction" trial in White Plains, N.Y., April 8, 1991. (AP Photo/Mike Albans)
John Guarente, a printing salesman, looks at a shipping invoice while testifying in the Carolyn Warmus "Fatal Attraction" murder trial in White Plains, N.Y., March 26, 1991. Differences in various logos printed on the telephone company MCI's bills and the shipping dates of the bills to MCI was explained by Guarente. Testimony was given that MCI has the computer tape that originally recorded a call from Carolyn Warmus' home to a New Jersey gun shop. (AP Photo/Mario Suriani)
Lisa Kattai sits in the witness stand during cross-examination by the defense in the murder trial of Carolyn Warmus in White Plains, N.Y., March 20, 1991. Warmus is on trial accused of the murder of her lover's wife. (AP Photo/Pool/Alan Zale)
Lisa Kattai shows a wallet with a replacement license to jurors during her testimony in the Carolyn Warmus murder trial in White Plains, N.Y., March 19, 1991. Prosecutors allege Kattai's original license was used by Warmus for identification to purchase ammunition. (AP Photo/Mario Suriani)
Private investigator Vincent Parco testifies at the trial of Carolyn Warmus in White Plains, N.Y., March 5, 1991. Parco claimed tremendous personal stress made him so confused that he sold an illegal weapon to Carolyn Warmus. Warmus is charge in the murder of Betty Jeanne Solomon. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
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The defendant was a 23-year-old schoolteacher when she started an affair with married colleague Paul Solomon, who was 17 years older than his just-out-of-college lover. Prosecutors charged that after killing her romantic rival, Warmus met Solomon for cocktails at a hotel bar before they had sex inside his car.

Eight months after the murder, she allegedly stalked Solomon and his new paramour when they went to Puerto Rico on vacation. While investigators initially suspected the husband was the shooter, Warmus was indicted 13 months after the murder.

She resolutely declared her innocence in the headline-making case, and her first trial ended in a hung jury. A second trial in 1992 led to a conviction for second-degree murder, with since-disgraced private investigator Vincent Parco a key prosecution witness.

Parco testified that he sold Warmus a silencer-equipped .25-caliber Beretta Jetfire pistol for $2,500 only days before the killing.

As Warmus leaves prison, Parco is behind bars at the Brooklyn Detention Complex after he was whacked with a sentence of 1-to-3 year last week for trying to blackmail a witness in a child sex abuse case. Prosecutors charged that Parco plied the man with prostitutes and recorded their sexual encounters to try and ensure the witness' silence.

Warmus is the second high-profile Bedford Hills parolee this year, exiting two months after former radical Judith Clark was turned loose.

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