Three out of five Conservatives plan to vote for the Brexit Party in European elections

People take away Brexit Party placards after a rally in Clacton-on-Sea, Essex (Picture: PA)

Three out of five Conservatives plan to vote for the Brexit Party in the upcoming European elections, a poll says.

The survey, by the Conservative Home website, found that 61% of Tory members will switch allegiance to the newly formed Brexit Party, led by Nigel Farage.

In comparison, only 22% of those members plan on voting Conservative at the European elections on May 23.

The poll of 1,550 Conservatives found that 3% will vote for the new Change UK party, while 2% will vote Liberal Democrat.

Just 0.19% plan on voting Ukip.

Conservative Home editor, Paul Goodman, said there are a number of reasons why Tory voters are turned off their own party.

"It may be worth running through the reasons that we floated for this dreadful result for the Conservatives," he said.

"They are as follows. First, anger at the postponement of Brexit after it had been promised over 100 times for March 29.

"Second, a backlash against Theresa May's talks with Jeremy Corbyn, which now seem to be nearing a climax, whatever happens. This has infuriated and baffled many members.

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Nigel Farage during his Brexit Party's first press conference of the European Election campaign in central London.
Nigel Farage during his Brexit Party's first press conference of the European Election campaign in central London.
Nigel Farage (left) and Richard Tice during the Brexit Party's first press conference of the European Election campaign in central London.
Nigel Farage handouts during the Brexit Party's first press conference of the European Election campaign in central London.
Nigel Farage (centre) and Richard Tice (right) arrive for the Brexit Party's first press conference of the European Election campaign in central London.
A supporter holds his dog wrapped in a union flag at a Brexit Party rally at Mill Farm Sports Village, Wesham, Lancashire.
Nigel Farage speaks during a Brexit Party rally at Mill Farm Sports Village, Wesham, Lancashire.
Supporters at a Brexit Party rally at Mill Farm Sports Village, Wesham, Lancashire.
Ann Widdecombe speaks during a Brexit Party rally at Mill Farm Sports Village, Wesham, Lancashire.
Nigel Farage at a Brexit Party rally at Mill Farm Sports Village, Wesham, Lancashire.
Leader of the Brexit Party Nigel Farage with former Tory minister Ann Widdecombe, who has defected from the Conservatives to join the Brexit Party, in Westminster, London.
Supporters at a Brexit Party rally at Mill Farm Sports Village, Wesham, Lancashire.
Leader of the Brexit Party Nigel Farage with former Tory minister Ann Widdecombe, who has defected from the Conservatives to join the Brexit Party, in Westminster, London.
Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage with Aileen Kelly, 74, at the Moon and Starfish public house during during a walkabout and rally in Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, for his Brexit Party.
Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage with Aileen Kelly, 74, at the Moon and Starfish public house during during a walkabout and rally in Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, for his Brexit Party.
Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage arrives on an open top bus for a walkabout and rally in Clacton-on-Sea, Essex.
Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage arrives on an open top bus for a walkabout and rally in Clacton-on-Sea, Essex.
Nigel Farage at the Moon and Starfish public house during a walkabout and rally in Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, for his Brexit Party.
Brexit party supporters await the arrival of Nigel Farage during a walkabout and rally in Clacton-on-Sea, Essex.
People attend a Brexit Party rally on the sea front at Clacton-on-Sea, Essex.
People attend a Brexit Party rally on the sea front at Clacton-on-Sea, Essex.
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"Third, the belief that they provide a free hit chance to protest. Fourth, the belief that Nigel Farage provides a respectable pro-Brexit alternative (backing for UKIP in the survey has collapsed).

"Finally, the hope that a really bad result might prove to be a trigger for leadership change."

Meanwhile, a report by The UK in a Changing Europe think tank said the European Parliament elections will be treated like a new Brexit referendum by many.

Professor Anand Menon, director of The UK in a Changing Europe, said: "There is an irony that the upcoming European elections will be the most scrutinised, watched and dissected.

"And yet it remains far from certain whether - and if so for how long - any of the British MEPS will take up their seats."

The report states: "Like it or not, convincingly or not, many people will portray the election as a proxy Brexit referendum.

"As for the EU itself, the elections will, obviously, have a bearing on the composition of the European Parliament.

"They will determine the balance of power - between pro-European and nationalist-populist forces, and between left and right - and influence important decisions taken about key appointments to top EU jobs and the future agenda for Europe.

"All things being equal, British MEPs will play a part in those debates, even if their tenures do not last much longer than it takes for these initial decisions to be made."

- This article first appeared on Yahoo

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