Shamima Begum is not our problem, says Bangladesh government

Bangladesh's government has said that Shamima Begum, the teenage Londoner who fled to Syria, is not their problem.

The country's Foreign Minister Abdul Momen said the teenager is British, not Bangladeshi, and if she travelled to Dhaka she could be hanged for terrorism.

"We have nothing to do with Shamima Begum. She is not a Bangladeshi citizen," he told ITN.

"She never applied for Bangladesh citizenship. She was born in England and her mother is British.

"If anyone is found to be involved with terrorism, we have a simple rule, there will be capital punishment. And nothing else.

"She will be put in prison and immediately, the rule is, she should be hanged."

Begum, 19, was stripped of her British nationality by the current Home Secretary Sajid Javid in February.

She was one of three Bethnal Green schoolgirls who fled to Syria and joined Islamic State in 2015.

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Shamima Begum reacting to question in news interview
BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE Undated handout still taken from CCTV issued by the Metropolitan Police of east London schoolgirl Shamima Begum, going through security at Gatwick airport, before catching a flight to Turkey in 2015 to join the Islamic State group, she is now heavily pregnant and wants to come home.
BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE Undated handout file still taken from CCTV issued by the Metropolitan Police of (left to right) 15-year-old Amira Abase, Kadiza Sultana, 16, and Shamima Begum before catching a flight to Turkey in 2015 to join the Islamic State group, Shamima Begum is now heavily pregnant and wants to come home.
BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE Undated handout photo issued by the Metropolitan Police of east London schoolgirl Shamima Begum, who left Britain as a 15-year-old to join the Islamic State group and is now heavily pregnant and wants to come home.
Sahima Begum (sister of Shamima Begum) and Abase Hussen (father of Amira Abase ) leave the Houses of Parliament in London, after giving evidence to the Home Affairs Select Committee after three schoolgirls are feared to have joined Islamic State in war-torn Syria.
Handout comp of stills taken from CCTV issued by the Metropolitan Police of (left to right) Kadiza Sultana,16, Shamima Begum,15 and 15-year-old Amira Abase going through security at Gatwick airport, before they caught their flight to Turkey on Tuesday. The three schoolgirls believed to have fled to Syria to join Islamic State.
The famiiles of Amira Abase and Shamima Begum after being interviewed by the media at New Scotland Yard, central London, as the relatives of three missing schoolgirls believed to have fled to Syria to join Islamic State have pleaded for them to return home.
LONDON, ENGLAND - MARCH 10 : In this photo taken from video, Shamima Begum's sister Sahima Begum attends an evidence session at Parliaments Home Affairs Select Committee in the House of Commons, on three girls who are believed to have travelled to Syria to join Daesh (Islamic State of Iraq and Levant) in London, England on March 10, 2015. (Photo by House of Commons/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - MARCH 10 : In this photo taken from video, (L-R) Kadiza Sultana's Cousin Fahmida Aziz, Shamima Begum's sister Sahima Begum, Amira Abase's father Hussen Abase and Lawyer Tasnime Akunjee representing the families of the three schoolgirls missing in Syria attend an evidence session at Parliaments Home Affairs Select Committee in the House of Commons, on three girls who are believed to have travelled to Syria to join Daesh (Islamic State of Iraq and Levant) in London, England on March 10, 2015. (Photo by House of Commons/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
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In her time with IS she was married and had three children, though all three have died.

There were allegations that she worked for IS morality police and she was discovered at a Syrian refugee camp in March.

The UK government's official reason for depriving Ms Begum of her British passport has never been made public, although it is against the law to make someone stateless.

Regardless, Mr Momen said she was not welcome in Bangladesh.

U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces fighters fire on Islamic State militants (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

He said he would be "sad" if she was left stateless, but said it "nothing to do with us".

He compared the British government's decision to strip Ms Begum of her British citizenship to the treatment of the Rohingya by the Burmese authorities, many of who have fled to Bangladesh.

- This article first appeared on Yahoo

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