Huge severed shark head goes viral as people speculate about what ate it

A giant shark's head pulled from the water by a fisherman has captured the imagination of Facebook users – because it appears to have been chomped clean off by something even bigger.

Jason Moyce, also known as Trapman Bermagui, posted an image of the severed head of a mako shark which he and his employee caught off the coast of New South Wales in Australia.

A screen grab from the Trapman Bermagui Facebook page
(Trapman Bermagui/Facebook)

He wrote: "So this was all we got back of this monster mako. Unfortunately we didn't see what ate it but must of been impressive!!"

Mako sharks, which can grow to be around 12 feet long, are known for their speed as well as their propensity for jumping out of the water.

According to Mr Moyce, the head weighed around 100kg on its own.

The image of shark head quickly went viral, with Facebook users speculating over what could have done the damage.

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Mako sharks
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Mako sharks
A Mako Shark jumping into the boat
NEW BEDFORD, MA - JULY 14: A shortfin mako shark emerges from the water after being caught by Eric Kelly on the Kalida during the 31st North Atlantic Monster Shark Tournament on July 14, 2017 in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The annual non-profit fishing tournament brings fishermen from all over New England in search of shortfin mako, porbeagle and common thresher sharks. (Photo by Maddie Meyer Getty Images)
NEW BEDFORD, MA - JULY 14: A shortfin mako shark emerges from the water after being caught by Eric Kelly on the Kalida during the 31st North Atlantic Monster Shark Tournament on July 14, 2017 in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The annual non-profit fishing tournament brings fishermen from all over New England in search of shortfin mako, porbeagle and common thresher sharks. (Photo by Maddie Meyer Getty Images)
South Africa
shortfin mako shark, Isurus oxyrinchus, off Cape Point, South Africa, Atlantic Ocean
Underwater view of shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) swimming in sea, West Coast, New Zealand
Mako shark swimming near the surface out in the open ocean. This image was taken on a baited shark dive 50 kms offshore past Western Cape.
Shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) released after tagging, California, USA, Pacific Ocean
The short fin mako shark is sometimes referred to as the blue pointer or bonito shark. They are well-adapted and active pelagic sharks like their cousin, the Great White shark, keeping their body temperature warmer than the surrounding water. Makos have a high metabolic rate and efficient in heat-exchange system as the Great Whites. These sharks are known to for its speed and agility, reaching bursts up to 42 miles per hour. This species exhibits countershading with its brilliant metallic blue coloration dorsally and white ventrally. The demarcation between blue and white is very distinct in the mako shark.Short Fin Mako sharks inhabits offshore in temperate and tropical seas worldwide.
Short fin mako shark image taken 50 kms offshore out past Western Cape.
Blue shark swimming in blue water near the surface at the dive site called 'Azores Banks', The Azores, Portugal.
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Some suggested orcas may have been responsible, but others felt tiger sharks or great whites were more likely.

One Facebook user, Greg Doble, wrote: "Great White more than one as well, you can see the smaller or conveyor teeth outside major bite marks, not Orcas they tend to eat just the liver of large sharks and let the rest drop to the ocean floor."

Great white sharks, which have something of a solitary reputation, are known sometimes to hunt in pairs or even groups and share their prey.

Mr Moyce also said he found a marlin bill embedded in the head, which he said had likely been there for years with the shark having healed and grown around it.

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