Prehistoric alligator gar pulled from lagoon


An alligator gar weighing more than 100 pounds (seven stones/45kg) has been removed from a Lagoon in Louisiana. Pictures of the dead 'monster' fish were posted on facebook.

It is unknown how the massive creature ended up in the lagoon but there is speculation it may have somehow made its way over from a nearby canal.

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Unusual creatures
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Unusual creatures
FILE - In this June 13, 2012 file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. An effort is under way to reintroduce alligator gar into lakes, rivers and backwaters of several states possibly to help control populations of the invasive carp. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
In this July 6, 2016 photograph, an adult alligator gar awaits placement into a transportation tank at the Private John Allen National Fish Hatchery in Tupelo, Miss. The gar's easily identifiable head resembles an alligator and has two rows of needlelike teeth. This is one of several male and female adult alligator gar that are captured in fresh water lakes and rivers and are brought to the facility so they can lay and fertilize the eggs as biologists and environmentalists are working to reintroduce the once-reviled alligator gar as a weapon against the invasive Asian carp. The gar are later returned to the wild. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
This Aug. 12, 2015 photo provided by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources shows IDNR biologist Nerissa McClelland holding alligator gar collected during a sampling survey at Powerton Lake in Powerton, Ill. Biologists are restocking alligator gar in several states where it disappeared about a half-century ago, partly in the hope that it will be a powerful weapon against Asian carp. (Illinois Department of Natural Resources via AP)
In this July 6, 2016 photo, an adult alligator gar awaits placement into a transportation tank at the Private John Allen National Fish Hatchery in Tupelo, Miss. The gar's easily identifiable head resembles an alligator and has two rows of needlelike teeth. This is one of several male and female adult alligator gar that are captured in fresh water lakes and rivers and are brought to the facility so they can lay and fertilize the eggs as biologists and environmentalists are working to reintroduce the once-reviled alligator gar as a weapon against another huge species: invasive Asian carp. The gar are later returned to the wild. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)
Alligator Fish (Atractosteus spatula)
These bizarre sea creatures were captured on camera by a NOAA expedition off the southeastern coast of North America
These bizarre sea creatures were captured on camera by a NOAA expedition off the southeastern coast of North America
These bizarre sea creatures were captured on camera by a NOAA expedition off the southeastern coast of North America
These bizarre sea creatures were captured on camera by a NOAA expedition off the southeastern coast of North America
Oriental flying gurnard (dactyloptena orientalis) seen while scuba diving near Sipadan Island, Borneo in the Celebes Sea.
clear jellyfish washed up on the beach in iceland
Nautilus is hiding inside a Giant sea fan, Panglao, Philippines
clear jellyfish washed up on the beach in iceland
Bizarre Crocodile tropical fish on sandy ocean floor in camouflage with rainbow ripples of light.
Underwater view of blue bobtail squid
portuguese man o' war washed ashore in wind along atlantic coastline, fort lauderdale florida
Galapagos marine iguana, Amblyrhynchus cristatus , closeup of paw on the beach
Detail of the tentacles on a mushroom coral (Fungia sp.) in Lembeh Strait, Indonesia.
Detail of a fluorescing coral colony growing on a shallow reef in Raja Ampat, Indonesia.
Detail of the tentacles of a Christmas tree worm growing in Lembeh Strait, Indonesia.
Single nautilus swimming underwater
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The alligator gar is North America's largest freshwater fish and is found largely throughout parts of the southeastern US and Mexico. The fossil record traces its existence back to the Early Cretaceous over a hundred million years ago.

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