Prince Philip shocked and shaken in crash near Sandringham while he was driving

The Duke of Edinburgh was left "very shocked" and shaken following a car crash, but walked away unhurt after his vehicle reportedly overturned.

Philip, 97, was driving the car, thought to be a Range Rover, when the accident involving another vehicle happened close to the Queen's Sandringham Estate.

According to eyewitnesses, who contacted the BBC, Philip's Range Rover rolled over during the collision on Thursday afternoon.

The witnesses helped the duke from his vehicle the BBC reported, and its website quoted them as saying the Queen's consort was conscious but "very, very shocked" and shaken.

Norfolk Police said officers were called to the Sandringham Estate shortly before 3pm "following reports of a collision involving two cars.

Locator of the Duke of Edinburgh's crash
(PA Graphics)

A spokesman added that police and ambulance crews attended and two people in one of the vehicles suffered minor injuries.

It is thought the accident happened on the A149, a busy road running through the Sandringham Estate.

A Buckingham Palace spokeswoman confirmed the duke was driving when the accident happened.

She added: "He saw a doctor as a precaution and the doctor confirmed he was not injured."

The Queen and Philip have been staying at Sandringham over Christmas and the New Year. Steve Parsons/PA Wire
The Queen and Philip have been staying at Sandringham over Christmas and the New Year (Steve Parsons/PA)

The spokeswoman would not comment on suggestions Philip may have been travelling with a passenger, who is likely to have been his close protection officer.

Philip and the Queen, who has been informed about the accident, are staying at Sandringham, their residence during their traditional winter break.

The duke, who retired from public duties in the summer of 2017 and last April had a hip replacement operation, is known to remain active.

He was photographed in the summer driving a carriage, although he has given up competing competitively with the horse-drawn transport.

The Duke of Edinburgh remains active and continues to drive a carriage, although not competitively. Steve Parsons/PA Wire
The Duke of Edinburgh remains active and continues to drive a carriage, although not competitively (Steve Parsons/PA)

But with the Queen's consort in his 98th year there may be calls from some for the duke to give up driving.

Edmund King, AA president, said: "Young, predominantly male, drivers are much more likely to crash within six months of passing their test than older drivers within six months of hanging up their keys.

"Older drivers often self-restrict their driving by not driving at night and only driving on familiar roads.

"The decision to hang up your keys is a tough one but should be based on personal advice from your GP and family, rather than being based on some arbitrary age."

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