Social workers involved in St Helena child abuse inquiry take legal action

Two social workers who say an inquiry report into allegations of child abuse on the British overseas territory of St Helena destroyed their professional reputations have taken legal action.

Claire Gannon and Martin Warsama, who worked on St Helena and made cover-up allegations, have sued the Foreign Office and the senior barrister who led the inquiry.

They say they "stand by the accuracy and honesty of their disclosures" and say conclusions were reached on the basis of an inquiry which was procedurally unfair.

Lawyers representing ministers and inquiry chairman Sasha Wass QC dispute their claim and say the litigation should not proceed.

A judge was on Friday considering issues in the case at a High Court hearing in London.

Barrister Neil Sheldon, who is leading a legal team representing Foreign Office ministers, asked the judge, Master Victoria McCloud, to halt the litigation and dismiss the claim launched by Ms Gannon and Mr Warsama.

The inquiry had been set up by ministers following corruption and cover-up allegations which had been raised in newspaper articles and leaked documents and made by Ms Gannon and Martin Warsama.

An inquiry report published in December 2015 concluded that: St Helena did not "attract sex tourism"; said allegations that the island in the South Atlantic was a "paedophiles' paradise" were not true; reported "no corruption at all"; and found no evidence of any attempt by the Foreign Office, the Department for International Development, the St Helena government or police to cover up child abuse.

The report said: "We stress that there was no 'cover-up' as alleged by Ms Gannon and Mr Warsama, rather an ignorance of proper safeguarding procedure."

Nicholas Bowen QC, who represents Ms Gannon and Mr Warsama, told the judge the conclusions of the Wass Inquiry "destroyed" the professional reputations of his clients.

He said the inquiry process was "procedurally" unfair and said Ms Gannon and Mr Warsama were entitled to "just satisfaction" for their loss.

Ms Gannon and Mr Warsama say their claim should not be dismissed but say evidence should be analysed at a trial.

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