What the papers say - March 4


As the big freeze starts to thaw, the Sunday papers turn their attention to other matters - including the fallout from Theresa May's Brexit speech.

The Mail on Sunday reports that the fragile Cabinet truce was "blown apart" as one of Boris Johnson's allies mounted an "astonishing" attack on the Prime Minister.

The paper says the senior MP accused one of Mrs May's most trusted aides of leaking a letter by the Foreign Secretary in a "revenge attack" for Brexit.

Political tensions also appear on the front of the Independent, which reports that ministers were accused of "breaking a promise" to introduce a reform to cut the number of benefit sanctions.

The paper says the plans were "quietly shelved" by the Tories.

The Sunday Telegraph leads on what it describes as a tax "stitch-up" at the BBC, reporting that the corporation faced a "revolt" by presenters being pursued by HM Revenue and Customs.

The paper also features a photo of actor Gary Oldman, one of the British contenders at Sunday night's Oscars.

Oldman also appears on the front of the Sunday Times, which suggests his nomination for playing Winston Churchill in the film Darkest Hour could prove his "Oscar dawn".

The paper leads on a story about internet giants being accused of profiting from sex trafficking as a new wave of "pop-up brothels" swept the country.

Weather does make the front of one paper - the Observer.

The paper suggests the big freeze cost the UK £1 billion a day, and could halve GDP growth in the first three months of the year.

Elsewhere, the Sunday Mirror claims taxi rapist John Worboys will get 24-hour protection, costing £300,000 a year, if he is released.

The Sunday People reports that Meghan and Harry will have an armed protection officer in their carriage for their wedding, while the Sunday Express says GPs are to offer genetics tests to patients for the first time.