What the papers say - February 23


The resignation of a Unicef executive after allegations of inappropriate behaviour features prominently in Friday's papers.

The Guardian says boss Justin Forsyth was "forced" to resign in the wake of the claims during his time as chief executive of Save the Children. He said he quit the role "because of attempts to damage aid organisations and the humanitarian sector".

The Metro leads on the same story, calling it "the latest blow to hit the embattled charity sector".

Elsewhere, The Times reports on the story that Oxfam GB has been suspended in Haiti for two months pending an investigation into sexual misconduct, while leading on the "chaos" of the lecturers' strike. It says university chiefs are split over the walkouts.

The Telegraph leads on a former British Army officer who is facing being investigated for the eighth time over the death of an Iraqi teenager 15 years ago.

The Daily Mirror continues with its opt-out organ donation campaign, saying transplant boy Max Johnson is urging MPs to vote for a change in the law.

The Daily Mail claims plastic drinking straws will soon be outlawed across Britain. It says Environment Secretary Michael Gove is "set to announce a ban within months".

The Independent leads on research that more than 200 million medication errors are made in the NHS every year, which "contribute to as many as 22,300 deaths a year".

Under the headline "Antiques Rude Show", The Sun reveals pensioners in Christchurch, Dorset, were given an "eye-popping treat" when a troupe of pole dancers performed at their care home.

And the Financial Times front page includes a warning from the OECD that a "rising tide" of sovereign debt is set to hit developed nations as interest rates rise.