What the papers say - February 19


Stars from film and television grace the front pages as Sunday night saw the Bafta Awards take place at the Royal Albert Hall in London.

Most nominees and guests wore black in support of the Time's Up campaign. Florence Pugh features on the front of the Telegraph wearing a ring in support of the movement. It also leads on how the "obesity crisis" is being fuelled by hidden calories, with officials warning the average person is underestimating their intake by 50%.

Pugh is also pictured on the front of The Sun, which also picks out the choice of dress of the Duchess of Cambridge. The pregnant royal bucked the trend in a dark green dress for the ceremony, with The Sun saying "Bafta luvvies fumed" at the royal for not wearing black in support of the campaign against sexual harassment.

The Daily Mail, however, asks whether Kate's black sash was a sign in support of the equality protest, while leading on claims by a former spy that Labour MPs were paid to meet Eastern Bloc agents during the Cold War.

Made In Dagenham star Gemma Arteton is featured n the front of The Guardian alongside "Dagenham Girls" Gwen Davis and Eileen Pullen - with all three opting to wear black on the Bafta red carpet. Its main story focuses on Theresa May's plans to make universities charge less for some courses.

The Metro leads on the same story ahead of the Prime Minister's speech on a review of higher education. She is quoted in the paper as saying Britain now has "one of the most expensive systems of university tuition in the world".

The i says Mrs May's plans are being challenged by senior Tories and Universities UK, with concerns the new funding model will be "divisive".

The Times' front page warns savers are being "tricked out of half a million pounds every day" due to a rise in cybercriminals targeting pension pots.

The Financial Times leads on Donald Trump's tweets over the Russia probe, saying the US president has denied any collusion between his campaign and Moscow.

And the Daily Mirror's campaign for an opt-out system on organ donation leads its front page, with a family revealing how their daughter's heart saved the life of 10-year-old Max Johnson.