In Pictures: Charting protests by suffragettes that helped lead to law change

Daring stunts, law-breaking and non-violent forms of protest were all part of the campaign for women's suffrage.

Some 100 years since the Representation of the People Act passed on February 6 1918, which allowed women over 30 with certain property qualifications to vote, we chart the protests that led to the change.

A suffragette campaigning for the vote in 1908 (PA)
A suffragette campaigning for the vote in 1908 (PA)
A suffragette procession passing through Parliament Square, London in 1908 (PA)
A suffragette procession passing through Parliament Square, London, in 1908 (PA)
Flora Drummond, left. giving instructions to suffragettes dressed as prisoners in 1908 (PA)
Flora Drummond, left, giving instructions to suffragettes dressed as prisoners in 1908 (PA)
Members of the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) on a horse-drawn carriage driven by Emmeline Pankhurst in 1910 (PA)
Members of the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) on a horse-drawn carriage driven by Emmeline Pankhurst in 1910 (PA)
Suffragette Miss Pankhurst addressing the crowd in Trafalgar Square during a rally (PA)
Suffragette Miss Pankhurst addressing the crowd in Trafalgar Square during a rally (PA)
Suffragette Sylvia Pankhurst, who was one of Emmeline Pankhurst's three daughters, at her desk in 1911 (PA)
Suffragette Sylvia Pankhurst, who was one of Emmeline Pankhurst's three daughters, at her desk in 1911 (PA)
Emmeline Pankhurst leaving Bow Street after getting bail on a conspiracy charge in 1912 (PA)
Emmeline Pankhurst leaving Bow Street after getting bail on a conspiracy charge in 1912 (PA)
Suffragette Emily Davison after she was fatally injured by the King's horse during the Epsom Derby in 1913 (PA)
Suffragette Emily Davison after she was fatally injured by the king's horse during the Epsom Derby in 1913 (PA)
Suffragettes during a mass meeting at the Royal Albert Hall in 1913 (PA)
Suffragettes during a mass meeting at the Royal Albert Hall in 1913 (PA)
Emmeline Pankhurst, one of the founding members of the Women's Social and Political Union, being arrested by police outside Buckingham Palace in 1914 , while trying to present a petition to George V (PA)
Emmeline Pankhurst, one of the founding members of the Women's Social and Political Union, being arrested by police outside Buckingham Palace in 1914, while trying to present a petition to George V (PA)
A policeman restraining a demonstrator in 1914 as suffragettes gathered outside Buckingham Palace (PA)
A police officer restraining a demonstrator in 1914 as suffragettes gathered outside Buckingham Palace (PA)
A suffragette being arrested by police officers in 1914 (PA)
A suffragette being arrested by police officers in 1914 (PA)
Manchester-born Flora Drummond, who was known for dramatic stunts, a militant attitude to suffrage, and rallying speeches (PA)
Manchester-born Flora Drummond, who was known for dramatic stunts, a militant attitude to suffrage and rallying speeches (PA)
Universal adult suffrage came to Britain in 1929 and these women, between the ages of 21 and 28, trooped down to the polling station in Stepney, east London, to vote for the first time (PA)
Universal adult suffrage came to Britain in 1929 and these women, between the ages of 21 and 28, trooped down to the polling station in Stepney, east London, to vote for the first time (PA)
Woman's activist Amika George, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan (second left), Curator of the Historic Royal Palaces Lucy Worsley (second right) and Deputy Mayor Justine Simons (right) at the opening of an exhibition in Trafalgar Square to mark the centenary of women's suffrage (Kirsty O'Connor/PA)
Women's activist Amika George, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan (second left), Curator of the Historic Royal Palaces Lucy Worsley (second right) and Deputy Mayor Justine Simons (right) at the opening of an exhibition in Trafalgar Square to mark the centenary of women's suffrage (Kirsty O'Connor/PA)
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