What the papers say - November 18

Updated: 

British explorer Benedict Allen, Budget taxes and Brexit woes make the front of the weekend papers.

The Daily Mail's short-but-dramatic headline "RESCUED!" tells the tale of Mr Allen who went missing on an expedition to reach a remote tribe in Papua New Guinea.

The paper reveals how it launched a rescue missing by hiring a helicopter to find the 57-year-old, who had become trapped between warring tribes. In a conversation to his wife, it reports he told her: "I've been missing you and fighting every inch of the way to get back to you and the family."

A picture of a fresher-looking Mr Allen appears on the front page of the Independent, as it reports on him suffering from a bout of malaria following his rescue from the remote jungle.

And it also leads on predictions for next week's Budget, saying Chancellor Philip Hammond is poised to lift borrowing caps imposed on councils in a bit to boost housing.

Meanwhile, the Budget also features on the front of the Telegraph with reports of a possible tax on throwaway plastic. The paper says coffee cups and drinks bottles will be targeted as part of the "Government's war on harmful waste".

And Brexit does not escape the front page either, with the paper's lead story claiming that Europe is threatening to withhold Britain's final rebate payment, a right won by Margaret Thatcher in the Eighties, as part of the exit negotiations.

In foreign news, The Times leads with a picture of Robert Mugabe who emerged for the first time from military-imposed house arrest to preside at a university graduation ceremony.

The FT Weekend also reports on the growing pressure urging Zimbabwe's president to resign after nearly four decades in power.

The Daily Mirror tells the story of a man's "11-month ordeal" after facing court for tackling a raider at his home. The paper reports that it took jurors just 30 minutes to clear father Carl Sinclair, reporting him as saying: "I did what any man would do."

While the Guardian says: "Get a dog, live longer". The striking image of a man's best friend highlights a study's findings that owning a dog can cut people's risk of heart disease.