What the papers say - October 29

Updated: 

From the continuing political turmoil in Spain to a "safety crisis" in the NHS, Sunday's papers feature a mixed bag of news on the front pages.

According to the Sunday Telegraph, the NHS medical director believes the "chaotic organisation" of the health service is putting patients' lives at risk.

Professor Sir Bruce Keogh told the paper that the lack of one simple system to issue safety directives was putting people in danger, and said that too many hospitals were putting cost-cutting ahead of patient safety.

The Sunday Times reports that prisoners are to be given the vote in a "human rights U-turn", with those sentenced to less than a year behind bars set to be let out on day release in order to go home and vote.

The paper says the move comes as a leaked document warns that cuts to police are hampering the fight against terrorism.

Brexit is never far from the top of the news agenda, and features prominently on the Observer front page.

The paper reports how two leading Tory donors have warned Theresa May to prepare for a "no deal" Brexit to avoid an "unsatisfactory and unfavourable deal" that would "poison relations with Europe" for another generation.

The Mail on Sunday also picks up a political theme, reporting on a "new sexism storm" in Westminster.

The paper says Government minister Mark Garnier had admitted to asking his secretary to buy sex toys for him.

The Independent reports that Liam Fox has been "ridiculed" for an "alarming" lack of trade negotiators in the Department for International Trade.

Away from UK politics, the Sunday Express turns its attentions to the escalating tensions in Spain.

The paper describes the country as being "on a knife edge"and says that tourism has been hit, reporting a 22% drop in flight bookings to the region in the past month.

Elsewhere, the Sunday Mirror reports on a "shock breach" after a memory stick holding Heathrow security secrets was found in the street.

According to the paper, it contained information such as the security measures used to protect the Queen when she uses the airport, as well as files disclosing every type of ID needed to protect her.