What the papers say - October 19

Updated: 

Thursday's papers are as mixed as the weather on an autumn day, with Brexit, free speech at universities and blackmail accusations against the FA's chief executive featuring on the front pages.

The Daily Telegraph runs with a story about Britain's continuing negotiations on leaving the European Union ahead of Theresa May meeting EU leaders in Brussels.

The paper reports a letter has been signed by leading Brexiteers saying Mrs May must feel able to call time on the talks if European politicians do not agree to further trade talks.

Brexit also features on the front of the Times with the paper saying Britain is facing an increased divorce bill to pay for EU pensions. The paper also reports that universities will no longer be able to adopt the practice of "no platforming", where controversial speakers are not allowed to air their views.

And completing a Brexit hat-trick is the Metro - which reports on Theresa May saying she will make it as "easy as possible" for EU nationals currently living in the UK to remain after the UK leaves the union.

The Guardian reports that leading staff at the Football Association are being urged to resign after chief executive Martin Glenn was accused of "behaviour bordering on blackmail".

The Sun leads on a story about Sir Richard Branson reportedly trying "to chat up" Jenson Button's future wife. The paper said the Formula One star told the Virgin tycoon "that's well out of order".

The story of Max Johnson - who was given a heart transplant - is on the front of the Mirror, with his parents thanking the donor and saying their boy is "looking after his new heart".

The financial health of the nation is making the headlines in the Financial Times which reports that millions of people are borrowing from friends or family.

Meanwhile, the Independent reports the police are advising Kensington and Chelsea Council not to release some correspondence about fire risks at Grenfell Tower.