Bank Holiday revellers warned of rain storms as they enjoy sun

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A Bank Holiday heatwave has seen sunseekers flood beaches across the country, but forecasters have warned a very different kind of deluge is on its way.

Flash flooding could hit parts of the UK as rain storms lash areas of southern England and Wales between Sunday and Monday, prompting a weather alert from the Met Office.

The "yellow" warning, covering between midday on Sunday and 4pm on Monday, warned homes and roads could fall victim to the turn in conditions.

Heavy downpours could feature with thunder and lightening, but the "hit and miss" nature of storms meant "many places will likely see little or no impacts", the update said.

It will dampen the summertime mood many enjoyed this weekend, as blue skies and high temperatures prevailed over much of the country.

On Saturday, the warm conditions peaked at 27 C (80.6F) in Weybourne, Norfolk, and Sunday saw temperatures in the low 20s, the Met Office said

The heat comfortably outstripped the average for late May, a spokesman added, which tends to linger between 16C (60.8F) and 18C (64.4F) in England and Wales.

Despite the forthcoming damp, which is expected to centre on the south-east of England over Sunday night and sweep north throughout the day, temperatures are expected to stay high.

The Met Office weather warning said: "Some areas of heavy rain will move north-eastwards during Sunday and into Monday across parts of southern England and Wales with some locally torrential downpours and thunder possible.

"Many areas will see rain at times but the extent of the most intense and thundery downpours will be limited. Only small areas are likely to see these downpours at any one time.

"This could result in some disruption, with sudden flooding of roads, transport routes, homes and businesses possible locally. Frequent lightning in association with the heaviest rain may also temporarily disrupt power supplies.

"However, given the hit-and-miss nature of the heavy rain and thunderstorms, many places will likely see little or no impacts."