Human rights lawyer Phil Shiner admits misconduct over Army Iraq abuse claims

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Controversial human rights lawyer Phil Shiner, who brought murder and torture claims against British soldiers, accepts he will be stuck off after admitting misconduct charges, a disciplinary tribunal has heard.

Mr Shiner, a solicitor who worked for the now-defunct Public Interest Lawyers, has admitted eight allegations of acting without integrity.

He also accepts one allegation that he acted recklessly by claiming at a press conference in February 2008 that the British Army had unlawfully killed, tortured and mistreated Iraqi civilians at the Battle of Danny Boy, although he disputes he was dishonest.

Mr Shiner admitted nine more charges in part, accepting he acted without integrity but denying dishonesty.

He denies six allegations, including misleading the £31 million Al-Sweady inquiry and the Legal Services Commission over legal aid grants.

The Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT) heard that he had submitted a letter making the admissions on the eve of a case management hearing on Thursday.

Mr Shiner dropped a bid to have the case heard in private and to remain anonymous last month.

Andrew Tabachnik, putting the case against Mr Shiner for the Solicitors Regulation Authority, said: "Even on the basis of his own admissions, Professor Shiner accepts this tribunal must strike him off at the end of this case."