10 used cars that cost more than a new version

If you’re in the market for a new car right now, you might have noticed that you’ll have to wait a long time for your vehicle to arrive.

That’s because the semiconductor chip crisis is continuing to affect the industry, meaning car manufacturers can’t build cars quickly enough to meet demand.

What’s bad for the new car market has been great for used cars, as buyers are turning to second-hand models that are available instantly instead of waiting.

Porsche 718 Spyder
(Porsche)

The result is that used car prices are booming, with some vehicles now costing more than their new equivalents.

In an exclusive interview with CarDealerMagazine.co.uk, car pricing experts Cap HPI have revealed the models that cost more than new.

Derren Martin, head of valuations at Cap HPI, told CarDealerMagazine.co.uk: “When you can’t get a new car, or you’ve got to wait six months for it, obviously the used one becomes a lot more attractive and the new price becomes almost irrelevant.

“You can’t get it so that price is almost not even a benchmark for the time being.

Porsche 718 Spyder
(Porsche)

“We are hearing that consumers are starting to baulk at it a little bit and saying ‘well I’ll wait’, but we’ve got that ‘I want it now’ attitude with everything in life now and the used cars have become so popular because of that.”

Based on vehicles being one year old with 10,000 miles, the Dacia Sandero has seen the biggest percentage increase of 119 per cent. The average new price is £9,772 but the average used price is now £11,673, an increase of £1,901.

In second is the Porsche 718 Spyder, increasing 115 per cent to £86,250, followed by the Porsche Macan, up 114.4 per cent to £64,125. The top five is completed by the Porsche Cayman GT4 at 114 per cent and the Tesla Model X at 109 per cent.

The rest of the top 10 comes from the Toyota GT86 (108.4 per cent), Ford Mustang (108.1 per cent), Lamborghini Urus (107.7 per cent), Range Rover Evoque (107.6 per cent) and Ford Mustang Convertible (107.1 per cent).