Job applications surge due with return to work after festive break

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Job applications are set to surge today as people return to work and decide to move on, a report predicts.

Jobsite said there was a 60% increase in applications on the first day back in work a year ago, with the trend expected to continue.

Nick Gold, chief executive of Jobsite, said: "Our data suggests that rather than using their time off to find their next role, candidates are stepping up their job searches once they return to work.

"We see a remarkable growth in applications, candidate registrations and visits during the first working week of the year, with an exceptional spike on the first working Monday as professionals settle back into their routine and begin to action their New Year's resolutions.

"What's more surprising is the number of visits and applications on Christmas Day. Clearly jobseekers are finding time between opening presents and eating the turkey to find their next job."

Data from another job site, CV-Library, found that Liverpool, Edinburgh and London are the top locations to find a new job this year.

The top 10 cities to look for work in 2017 were said to be:

1. Liverpool 

2. Edinburgh 

3. London 

4. Southampton

5. Portsmouth 

6. Manchester 

7. Hull 

8. Cardiff 

9. Glasgow 

10. Bristol 

Lee Biggins, managing director of CV-Library, said: "It's great to see the job markets in these key UK cities performing so well, and it's particularly good news for local jobhunters who are looking for work this January."

A separate report by the Magnet.me site showed that most graduates are optimistic about finding a job this year.

Founder Vincent Karremans said: "Despite the seismic political and economic events of 2016, young people are buoyant about the year ahead.

"Brexit fears have not materialised and there is air of optimism. Alarmingly, though, more than half of those polled indicated they would leave the UK in 2017 to find work abroad.

"With the March Brexit deadline looming, they are clearly nervous about its impact and their future in the UK.