Pub landlord who built 12 ft wooden Stonehenge must demolish it

Stonehenge replica set for demolition: unusual replicas that stood the test of time

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Woodhenge

Charlie Newman, the 49-year-old landlord of the Square and Compass in Worth Matravers in Dorset, has been ordered to demolish the 12 foot homage to Stonehenge he built in his field.

He had put together the massive wooden structure just before the summer solstice in June this year - using 35 tonnes of timber and a great deal of dedication and effort. Unfortunately, according to the BBC, Purbeck District Council were not impressed with his hard work, and ordered him to remove it.

He told the Daily Mail that he had decided to build it on his field, after cutting down two enormous pine trees and wondering what to do with all the wood. He said he put it together with four friends as 'a bit of fun', to provide something interesting for the locals and to attract tourists.

The villagers have largely been pleased with the new addition to the area, and some have even started a petition to encourage the council to let it stay.

The council, so far, haven't been swayed by the popularity of 'Woodhenge', and say it has to go. Newman said the council had been very reasonable, and when he asked if it could stay up for the summer, they gave him until the beginning of September to remove it.

Tributes

Over the years there have been several tributes to Stonehenge, some of them verging on the bizarre.

Around the same time as Newman's tribute this year, an appliance salesman in Maidstone in Kent built Fridgehenge outside his shop. He said at the time that it was safe because it had been bolted down, and it would stay for as long as the council allowed it.

Carhenge, meanwhile, is a replica built from cars, painted grey and balanced on top of one another. It was originally built in Nebraska by artist Jim Reindeers in 1986.

Phonehenge, meanwhile, is made from old British telephone boxes, and was built in a rock-and-roll-themed amusement park in South Carolina.

Foamhenge has been assembled from blocks of fibreglass in Natural Bridge, Virginia. It gets glowing reviews on Tripadviser, and many visitors report bumping into the artwork's creator during their visit.

And finally, if you want a piece of the replica action of your own, in Western Australia a full-size stone replica was put together by archaeology fans in Esperance. When the owners decided to move on in February this year, the model was included as part of the house sale - so a complete Stonehenge could be all yours for $5 million.

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