The Fixer: writing a will

Getting married invalidates any previous will you have made

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Have you been left out of pocket due to poor service or sharp practice? Do you have a money problem that won't go away?

It can seem impossible to get a fair result when you are battling a financial issue alone. But never fear! The AOL Money Fixer is here to help.

Dear Fixer,
I am about to get married to my girlfriend, who I have been with for the last four years.

However, I have a son from a previous relationship and I am very keen to make sure he gets some of my money should I die.

I already have a will stating that he is my main heir. But I am concerned about my marriage changing this.

Do I need to write a new will to protect my son? It's a bit of a sensitive subject, so I don't want to raise it with my fiancee if I can avoid it.

D Harper, Manchester

Dear Mr Harper,

If you get married or enter into a registered civil partnership, it invalidates any previous will you have made.

In other words, your new wife will automatically become your heir. So if you want any of your things to go to your son, you'll need to write a new will to prove it.

If you want to split your estate between your fiancee and your son, one way to broach the subject is to point out that you writing a new will could also be beneficial to her as it will avoid you dying "intestate" and leaving her facing a potentially lengthy legal battle.

You can also state in the new will who you want to look after your son should your previous partner die.

The Fixer

Whatever your financial problem, write to themoneyfixer@aim.com and The AOL Money Fixer will get on the case.

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