No-one wants to live on Margaret Thatcher Road

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Margaret Thatcher

After Margaret Thatcher died just over a year ago, Conservatives in her old constituency of Finchley wanted to recognise her contribution to politics by naming a road after her. Barnet Council called for volunteers to apply to change the name of their road to something commemorating the Iron Lady.

No-one has come forward.



Last June the council insisted that everything was on track: they told the Ham and High that a road would definitely be named after Thatcher, but that they had a few other projects that they were focusing on first.

However, almost a year later, Barnet Today printed a reminder to residents that Barnet Council was still waiting for a sensible suggestion for a renamed road - and volunteers who would like to see their street name changed to something reflecting the former Prime Minister.

Now the Daily Telegraph has reported one Barnet Councillor has said that they may have to name a street in a new development after her instead.

It seems that residents are concerned about a name that divides the country so much, and however keen residents may have been on their former MP, those with one eye on selling their home in future may be concerned that the name of their road could put some buyers off.

Famous names

Traditionally streets were often named after famous people - Victoria and Albert were favourites during the Victorian building boom, while Sir George Downing had one of the country's most memorable roads named after him, and Isaac Newton had Newton Street named after him.

More recently, there has been Bob Marley Way in Camden, a Steve Biko Way in Hounslow (named after the anti-apartheid activist), an Alan Turing Way in Manchester, and even a Bash Street in Dundee - named after the Beano comic strip. Unsurprisingly Liverpool is home to John Lennon drive, Paul McCartney Way, Ringo Starr Drive and George Harrison Way.

However, some names are more controversial. During the 1980s when Nelson Mandela was in prison and the political establishment was treating him as a terrorist, a number of left wing councils named roads after Mandela - in some instances they chose the road with the South African Consulate on them. Now, few people recognise this as anything other than the recognition of a globally-loved world leader.